The Sosa leak is worse than the Sosa 'roids

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Obviously the story of the day is Sammy Sosa. Earlier, Bob cataloged the non-surprise to the Sosa news. At NBC Sports proper, Mike Celzic writes that rather than burn Sosa at the stake, our focus should be on Bud Selig and Don Fehr.

My view: I share the lack of surprise Bob mentions and the lack of ire
at Sammy Sosa for many of the reasons Mike mentions. But to me, the
real issue here is the fact that list of the 2003 test results — which
was intended to be first confidential and then was supposed to be
destroyed — is being leaked. The MLBPA and/or Major League Baseball
screwed up royal in allowing that list to survive when they had agreed
that it would not. The people who subjected themselves to the drug
testing that formed its basis (a) did so in order to move the ball
forward on drug testing in baseball; and (b) had an expectation that
their identities would remain confidential. That expectation has now
been spectacularly confounded, and the practical result of it is that
anyone who cares about their privacy is now being sent the message that
they should not, under any circumstances, participate in their
employers’ drug testing program, however confidential it is supposed to
be. You never know: your name could wind up in the newspapers! Your
mileage may vary, but I don’t think the avoidance of workplace drug
testing is something anyone wants to encourage. As a result of all of
this, it’s my view that the list should be ordered destroyed, though I
suspect that in the Internet age, such an order would be meaningless.
Information wants to be free, and enough people have it now that I
suspect it all will be some day.

The greater wrong in my mind is the fact of the leaks themselves. I’m a
lawyer by trade, and it shocks me that fellow officers of the court are
divulging this sort of information to the media. This is evidence that
was seized in an ongoing criminal case that is subject to court order
putatively preventing its release. The act of leaking this stuff is, at
the very least, a violation of that court order and a violation of
legal ethics. Depending on the exact language of the order, it could be
a criminal act. I don’t know about you, but that causes me far more
concern than whether Sammy Sosa took steroids six years ago.

Alex Dickerson to miss 2017 season after undergoing back surgery

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Padres’ outfielder Alex Dickerson won’t see PETCO Park anytime soon — at least, not as its starting left fielder. The 27-year-old was diagnosed with a bulging disc in his lower back prior to the start of the 2017 season, and hasn’t made any kind of substantial progress in the months since. According to Dennis Lin of the San Diego Union-Tribune, he suffered a setback in his recovery process last week and is set to undergo a season-ending discectomy next Wednesday.

Over 285 plate appearances, Dickerson batted .257/.333/.455 with 10 home runs and a .788 OPS for the Padres in 2016. He missed several days with a right hip contusion last July, but hasn’t experienced any substantial health problems since undergoing surgery in 2014 to repair a torn ligament in his left ankle.

The expected recovery period for lower back surgery is 3-4 months, according to Lin, which puts Dickerson’s estimated return just a few days before the end of the regular season. The Padres aren’t scraping the bottom of the NL West, but their 29-44 record doesn’t bode well for a postseason run this year. Assuming Dickerson rehabs his back in a timely manner, he should be in fine form to enter the competition for left field next spring.

Video: Hanley Ramirez’s No. 250 career home run barely left the field

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Hanley Ramirez played a pivotal role during the Red Sox’ 9-4 win over the Angels on Friday night, crushing a two-run homer off of Alex Meyer to bring the Sox up to a four-run lead in the fourth inning.

Well, crushed might be the wrong word. The ball cleared the right field fence with a mere 350 feet, landing just beyond Pesky’s Pole to bring Ramirez’s career home run total to an even 250.

According to the ESPN Home Run Tracker, Ramirez’s milestone blast wasn’t the shortest home run of the year — not by a long shot. That distinction currently belongs to Rays’ outfielder Corey Dickerson, who skimmed the left field fence at Rogers Centre with a 326-foot homer back in April.