Pudge Rodriguez to make history

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Ivan Rodriguez is poised to tie Carlton Fisk’s all-time games-caught
mark tonight and, knees willing, break it tomorrow. Best of all, it’s
going to happen in Arlington, where his remarkable career got started.
That was a long time ago — his debut came a couple of weeks after I
graduated high school, and I’m an old man now — and Rodriguez’s long
career has the Houston Chronicle’s Jose De Jesus Ortiz, and others, recalling the career of one of the greatest catchers the game has ever seen:

As manager of the Kansas City Royals from 1995-97, [Bob] Boone actually predicted Rodriguez would break Fisk’s record.

“I’m proud of the fact I played the game right a long time,” Bob
Boone said. “You happen to get a record, that’s kind of neat, but it
really doesn’t affect my daily life. I can remember looking at Pudge
when I was managing Kansas City and thinking he would break the record.

“There’s an art form to not getting hurt. There’s a lot of
athleticism to not being hurt. We’d just look at each other, and I’d
think he was going to get the record. I just kind of smiled about it. I
think he’s a great player. I’ve been a fan of his a long time. The
combination of offense and defense he’s brought to the game has been
amazing.”

Is Boone genuinely admirable, or is his use of the phrase “played the
game right,” code for steroids in this case as it is in most other
cases in which it’s employed? I suppose there’s no escaping that
subject with Rodriguez since Jose Canseco claims in his book to have
educated him (along with Rafael Palmeiro and Juan Gonzalez) about
steroids when they were teammates in Texas. He also claims to have
acquired steroids on behalf of Rodriguez and to have personally
injected him. Given Canseco’s track record on these things, there’s
something more than an Ibanezeseque case to be made against Pudge on
this count.

But you know what? I don’t care. I’m not sure how everyone else
approaches this issue, but I’ve taken to making rough guesses about how
a PED-implicated player might have performed without the drugs, and
then determining whether he still seems like a Hall of Famer
afterwards. No, I’m not doing stats here nor do I claim to even be
doing anything approaching science. It’s just a mental exercise that I
think represents about the best anyone can do for the pre-testing era
players. Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens pass my little test. Mark
McGwire is a closer case. Rafael Palmiero fails it. There really aren’t
as many close cases as folks like to think.

Pudge is one of them. But with Pudge, I see a guy who was an amazing
defensive catcher before Canseco ever made it to Texas, and has
remained one even after the institution of testing and his subsequent
reduction in physique. If Canseco is telling the truth about Rodriguez,
we can probably expect that his power numbers would have been down, and
we can likewise expect that he may have missed a few more games to
injury or fatigue than he did over his long career.

Maybe your mileage varies on this — indeed, maybe you’d have a bar
on the door to the Hall of Fame for anyone implicated in the PED mess
— but takng his career as a whole, I still see a Hall of Famer when I
look at Ivan Rodriguez, and I will be cheering him tonight and tomorrow
as he makes history.

Curtis Granderson is close to making history

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - SEPTEMBER 22:  Curtis Granderson #3 of the New York Mets connects on a three-run home run in the second inning against the Philadelphia Phillies at Citi Field on September 22, 2016 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City.  (Photo by Mike Stobe/Getty Images)
Mike Stobe/Getty Images
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With a fourth-inning solo home run off of Phillies starter Jake Thompson, Mets outfielder Curtis Granderson reached the 30-homer plateau for the fourth time in his 13-year career. It’s a moment worth celebrating, only there’s one problem: he has just 56 RBI on the season.

There are many reasons for the low RBI total. 24 of Granderson’s 30 homers have come with the bases empty. He came into Sunday’s action hitting just .140 in 124 plate appearances with runners in scoring position and .197 with runners on base. He has hit leadoff for most of the season, meaning he’s had the Mets’ pitchers hitting “ahead” of him in the No. 9 slot as well as the Mets’ catchers typically hitting eighth. Mets catchers, collectively, have a .296 on-base percentage, the second-worst mark in the National League.

Since the end of August, Granderson has hit cleanup with Jose Reyes, Asdrubal Cabrera, and Yoenis Cespedes hitting in front of him. That change hasn’t been for naught, as he has 17 RBI in 21 games since.

Still, Granderson is on pace for the fewest RBI in a 30-homer season. Rob Deer and Felix Mantilla are tied for the record with 64 RBI. Deer (32 HR) accomplished the feat in 1992 with the Tigers and Mantilla (30 HR) in 1964 with the Red Sox. Only eight players have had 70 or fewer homers in a 30-homer season. Evan Gattis is currently sitting on 30 homers with 68 RBI.

MLB teams pay tribute to José Fernández’s memory

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Following the announcement of the 24-year-old’s death, Major League Baseball observed a moment of silence for José Fernández before each of today’s games. While this afternoon’s Marlins-Braves game was cancelled out of respect for the organization, Miami painted Fernández’s jersey number on the mound in honor of their former pitcher.

Other teams, like the Mets, Mariners, and Dodgers, chose to honor Fernández by hanging his No. 16 jersey in their dugout:

Bob Nightengale of USA Today Sports reports that David Ortiz‘s pregame retirement ceremony at Tropicana Field was canceled at the player’s request:

The Astros and Diamondbacks each displayed a personal tribute to Fernández, writing the number 16 on their caps and etching his number and initials in the bullpen:

Rest in peace, Fernández.