Baseball makes its pitch for the Olympics

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Four years ago,
baseball was told that, after 2008, its presence was neither requested
nor desired in the Olympics. Since then, the International Baseball
Federation has tried hard to get it back in. Today the IBAF made its pitch for 2016, and for what I think is the first time, got some concessions from Major League Baseball that may help its chances:

There would be no major league games on the day of the Olympic medal games.

would no MLB games broadcast at the times of Olympic Games, which means
Olympic baseball would create a schedule to have its games end before
MLB night games begin.

Even though MLB does not intend to stop
its season during the Olympics, there would be a “representative
number of the best players available (for the Games).”

International Baseball Federation would work with Olympic host cities
to finance construction and after-use costs of the two stadiums needed
for the five-day tournament, which would not be an issue for 2016
candidates Chicago and Tokyo, since they have stadiums.

There was
a sense in 2005 that the reason baseball (and softball) were axed from
the games was that they were too thoroughly dominated by America (see here).
That may have been true for softball — the U.S. women at the time were
unrivaled, and though that has changed somewhat since then, the
American women are still the best — but it was always a dubious claim
with respect to baseball given the high quality of Latin American and
east Asian teams. Many suspected that the decision was really a
cultural/political one, with IOC President Jacques Rogge taking what
was then a quite fashionable anti-American position. I don’t know if
that really was the case — people talked of the lack of
Olympic-quality drug testing in baseball at the time as another issue
too — but stranger things have happened with the Olympics.

announced concessions, however, seem not to address any
Olympic-specific problems with baseball. Rather, they seem to address
some of the criticisms voiced about the World Baseball Classic, where
the lack of participation by many of the best baseball players was seen
as a serious drawback (personally I think the injury risk is a bigger
drawback, but I’m not the biggest fan of international baseball, so
maybe I’m unique in that regard). If that was a concern, however, these
concessions don’t seem to do too terribly much to solve it. What
exactly does it mean that Major League Baseball will ensure that “a
representative number of the best players available” will play? How on
Earth could they do this? The 2016 Olympics will take place during the
height of the baseball season. Even if the games are played in Chicago
— one of the possible sites — I can’t see any team in contention
allowing their best players to go play for Team USA, Team Dominican
Republic, or Team Japan when so much is on the line in the regular
season. They can’t force them to participate, can they?

to this article, karate, roller sports, golf, rugby sevens, softball
and squash also are seeking spots on the program, and no more than two
of them will be chosen. If baseball in the Olympics means that my team
is going to lose its shortstop or setup man for a couple of weeks,
consider me rooting for squash.

Justin Turner suffers broken wrist after being hit by a pitch

Jamie Squire/Getty Images

Dodgers third baseman Justin Turner left Monday’s Cactus League game against the Athletics after he was hit by a pitch. He went for X-rays, revealing that he suffered a broken wrist, Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times reports. Shaikin adds that Turner is unlikely to return before May, noting that Braves first baseman Freddie Freeman missed six weeks with a similar injury last year and Astros outfielder George Springer missed nine weeks in 2015.

Needless to say, this is a huge loss for the Dodgers. Last year, Turner hit .322/.415/.530 with 21 home runs and 71 RBI in 543 plate appearances, helping the Dodgers reach the World Series. He made the All-Star team for the first time in his career and finished eighth in NL MVP balloting.

Thankfully, the Dodgers have some versatile players on the roster. Logan Forsythe could move from second base to third, giving Chase Utley more playing time at second. Enrique Hernandez could man the hot corner as well. Chris Taylor has played some third base, or he could shift to second base in Forsythe’s stead. The club should shed some light on how it plans to move forward following Turner’s injury.