Potent quotables: Castillo and Bradley face the music

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“I have to catch that ball. The ball
was moving a little bit. I didn’t get it. I feel bad. It was a routine
fly ball. … I need to get it. … I feel so bad. I don’t want to make
any errors, so I feel bad about myself. I made a mistake — I feel bad.”

– Luis Castillo, at a loss to explain the epic drop that allowed the Yankees to win Friday night’s game.

“I just closed my eyes and swung.”

– Rick Porcello, on becoming the first Tigers’ pitcher to have a multi-RBI game
since Joe Coleman in 1972. He was 2-for-3 at the dish. The 2o-year-old
Porcello wasn’t that bad on the mound either, allowing just a single
run over seven innings to improve to 7-4 on the season.

“We’re trying to win ball games up
here. If they need to make a move to help the team out, I’m all for
that. Going to Triple-A is never news you want to hear but I’m going to
go down there and try to find out what I need to do to find myself.”

– Howie Kendrick reacts to his demotion
to Triple-A Salt Lake. The 25-year-old second baseman was hitting just
.231/.281/.355 with four homers and 22 RBI in 186 at-bats this season.

“I wasn’t embarrassed. I’ve done a
whole lot of things to be embarrassed about. That’s water under the
bridge. The run was going to score, the fan got a souvenir. Worst case
scenario.”

– Milton Bradley, after committing the Cardinal sin of throwing the ball into the stands with just two outs. By the way, this might be the most accurate thing Bradley has ever said.

“The difference in this game, with
these young pitchers we have, I don’t even know if they watch baseball,
to be honest with you.”

– Jason Giambi, commenting on the excellent pitchers duel
between Tim Lincecum and Athletics’ rookie Vin Mazzaro on Friday night.
Lincecum got the better of him on Friday, hurling a complete-game
shutout, but Mazzaro has a 1.37 over his first three big league starts.

Each owner will get at least $50 million in early 2018 from the sale of BAMTech

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Earlier this year Disney agreed to purchase the majority stake in BAMTech, the digital media company spun off from MLB Advanced Media. We know it as the source of the technology for MLB.tv and MLB.com, but it’s far more wide-ranging than that now. At present it powers streaming for MLB, HBO, NHL, WWE, and, eventually, will power Disney’s and ESPN’s upcoming streaming services.

The company was started by an investment from baseball’s 30 owners, so they’re getting a big payout as a result of the acquisition. Earlier this morning Jim Bowden dropped this regarding how much of that payout is in the offing in the short term:

That’s probably on the low end, actually. Some people I’ve spoken to who are familiar with the acquisition say the figure is more like $68 million in Q1 of 2018.

Good for the owners! It was a savvy, forward-thinking investment that, in the past, baseball owners might not have made. Bud Selig, Bob Bowman and others deserve credit for convincing the Jeff Lorias and Jerry Reinsdorfs of the world to think big and long term. It’s money out of the sky, raining down upon the owner of your baseball team for, basically, doing nothing.

Money which should be remembered when your buddy complains about a relief pitcher getting $6 million for only pitching 65 innings. Money which should be remembered when your team’s GM says that he has to cut back on payroll in the coming year.