Heck, I'm not even mad, that's amazing

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In case you missed Friday night’s wildly entertaining, exciting and
ultimately infamous Mets-Yankees game, here are a few things you should
know:

… Robinson Cano hit one over the ridiculously short porch in right
center to open the scoring, but to be fair, it was a legit homer. More
on this later …

… Joba Chamberlain only allowed one hit and two runs. Unfortunately,
he also walked five, hit two, and lasted a mere four innings. Before
the game, a buddy of mine was furious over the previous night’s
disaster in Boston, and sarcastically noted that at least the Yanks’
eighth inning guy was resting up to throw five mediocre innings the
next night. One short pal …

… Keith Hernandez was absolutely on fire, describing an ugly third
inning by Joba as “like watching A ball.” Later, after Gary Sheffield
questioned a called strike on the inside corner, Hernandez said “That’s
the old Derek Jeter move, who never saw an inside fastball he didn’t
think was a ball” …

… Speaking of Sheff, he momentarily time-warped back to 2002,
crushing a hanging curve from Brett Tomko for a three-run homer. It was
one of those rising line drives hit so hard down the line it didn’t
have a chance to go foul. And Sheff wasn’t even halfway to first by the
time the camera cut back to him after it landed in the seats, clearly
milking the moment …

… That homer gave us a great trivia question: name the four players
who hit homers for the Yankees against the Mets AND for the Mets
against the Yankees. Answer: Sheffield, Robin Ventura, Tony Clark, and
Miguel Cairo (!) …

… Continuing a brutal week in the field, Nick Swisher Lupused a
Carlos Beltran line drive that was the catalyst for a four-run rally …

… Trailing 6-3, Jeter hit a fly ball to right-center that probably
traveled about 360 feet. But since this was at The Cathedral They Call
Yankee Stadium (man I despise Michael Kay), the ball landed four rows
deep. REALLY glad we didn’t have to hear John Sterling give his “El
Capitan!” …

… So with the Mets leading 6-4 in the sixth, Livan Hernandez ran out
of gas. And naturally, with the tying runs on base, Jerry Manuel
brought in Jon Switzer, who had been called up from triple-A about
three hours earlier and was now making his debut. What Manuel did was
put this kid in the best possible situation to succeed, only the exact
opposite. In the coming years, I’m sure Switzer will be able to laugh
about giving up a go-ahead three-run homer to Hideki Matsui, the first
major league batter he ever faced. Just not now …

… Because their best setup guy had just thrown four mediocre innings
a couple hours earlier, Joe Girardi brought in Mariano Rivera with two
outs in the eighth to face Beltran. Incredibly, Rivera walked only his
third batter of the year. Then, with Beltran running, David Wright
ripped an opposite field double that put the Mets in front. See, Mike
Francesa, he is clutch …

… Now it’s the bottom of the ninth, Francisco Rodriguez is on the
mound, and he has not blown a save yet this year. Of course, Mets fans
are terrified and assume that number one is about to happen, because
they’re getting flashbacks to all those closers who blew games against
the Yanks: Armando Benitez (at least three, including Game 1 in the
2000 World Series), John Franco (just threw up in my mouth), Billy
Wagner (four run lead in 2006!), and Braden Looper (I’m assuming) …

… Brett Gardner popped up to lead off, and Omir Santos caught it.
This seemed like a mundane feat at the time. Then Jeter singled up the
middle, and Johnny Damon pinch hit for Swisher. On a 3-2 count, K-Rod
threw a hellacious changeup that Damon swung through, but Jeter stole
second on the play. K-Rod wisely unintentionally intentionally walked
Mark Teixeira (who hit one in the third that probably still hasn’t
landed yet) and now Alex Rodriguez is up. And I’m only worried because
K-Rod likes to throws a ton of curveballs, and A-Rod probably has a
better chance of hitting that than his fastball …

… And A-Rod pops up a 94 mph fastball on a 3-1 count! Luis Castillo
is under it! No, wait, he’s drifting. And drifting. And drifting. And
just when he appears to be under it, he uses ONE HAND to try and catch
it. The ball pops out. Castillo stumbles to the ground. Then, almost as
egregiously as muffing the pop-up, HE THROWS TO SECOND BASE! WHY??
Teixeira, who clearly hustled the entire way, scored behind Jeter for
the winning run. 9-8 Yanks. K-Rod gets credited with a blown save and a
loss. Castillo really wishes he were somewhere else, and frankly, so do
Mets fans. Like, for good …

… Some beautiful replays: A-Rod, slamming the bat down, looking
crushed as he jogs to first, then eyes bulging as he sees the drop and
realizes he should start running hard, then shocked elation, probably
more so because he won’t have to deal with everyone calling him a
choker than the fact his team just won; Manuel, poker-faced as the ball
is hit into the air, and Sandy Alomar slides into the shot next to him,
ready for the postgame handshake, only to mouth a stunned “Oh s***” as
he sees the disaster that unfolds; and poor K-Rod, who simply put his
hands on his head in disbelief. Welcome to the Mets, Frankie! …

… Strange as it sounds, the ending to the game was so absurd, I’m
not as upset as you’d think a Mets fan might be (can’t speak for
everyone, of course), and this one will probably sting a lot more when
they’re a game out in September and you think back to all those ones
that got away. But right now, for me, it’s like that Ron Burgundy line:
“You pooped in the refrigerator? And you ate an entire wheel of cheese?
How’d you do that? Heck, I’m not even mad. That’s amazing.”

Mets tell Jay Bruce they plan on having him start in right field

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - SEPTEMBER 22:  Jay Bruce #19 of the New York Mets reacts after striking out in the ninth inning against the Philadelphia Phillies at Citi Field on September 22, 2016 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City.  (Photo by Mike Stobe/Getty Images)
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The Mets told Jay Bruce that the club plans on having him open the season as the everyday right fielder, Ken Davidoff of the New York Post reports. This comes as no surprise after the Mets failed to get any bites after dangling Bruce as a trade chip. The Mets reportedly wanted a pair of prospects in exchange for Bruce.

With Bruce in right, Yoenis Cespedes back in left, and Curtis Granderson in center, Michael Conforto appears to be the odd man out. He’ll either warm the bench or head back to Triple-A Las Vegas for regular at-bats.

Bruce, who turns 30 years old in April, had a rough final two months of the 2016 season after joining the Mets in a trade from the Reds. He hit a paltry .219/.294/.391 with eight home runs and 19 RBI in 187 plate appearances. Bruce, apparently, wanted to go anywhere but in New York.

Angels sign Eric Young, Jr. to a minor league contract

ATLANTA, GA - APRIL 11:  Eric Young Jr. #4 of the Atlanta Braves slides safely into third base on a RBI triple in the fifth inning against the New York Mets during the Braves opening series at Turner Field on April 11, 2015 in Atlanta, Georgia.  Andrelton Simmons #19 scored on the triple.  (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images
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Mike DiGiovanna of the Los Angeles Times reports that the Angels have inked outfielder Eric Young, Jr. to a minor league contract with an invitation to spring training.

Young, 31, played in just six games and logged one plate appearance in the majors this past season with the Yankees. He last played regularly in 2014. While Young doesn’t do much with the bat, he could provide value as a pinch-runner. He also offers versatility, having played all three outfield positions along with second base.

The Angels have Ben Revere as their fourth outfielder and Jefry Marte behind him, so Young would need to have a very impressive showing in spring training to find a spot on the Angels’ roster.