The curveball is a figment of your imagination

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Whenever you hear someone’s curveball described as “dropping off the table” take it with a grain of salt.

According to one professor anyway, the curveball’s action is part-physics, part-illusion, the movement aided by a trick of the eye.

Criss Angel would be proud.

“There’s something physical about it and something illusory about
it,” said Bucknell University professor Arthur Shapiro. … “They look
like they jump or break or do all these funky things, but they don’t.
The idea that the bottom falls out isn’t so. I’m not saying curveballs
don’t curve. I emphasize that, yes, they curve. They just do so at a
more gradual rate. Instead of making a sudden hook, they would form a
really big circle.”

Shapiro explains that the eye exaggerates the break because peripheral
vision is processed differently than straight on vision by the brain.
So as the ball approaches and the viewpoint changes, the eye makes the
ball’s break look stronger than it is.

Shapiro made a very cool graphic to explain his idea, which he insists is only a hypothesis.

So what do players think? Hall of Famer Mike Schmidt offered his
opinion for the story, and he had a thoughtful take, saying he agreed
that the curveball presents an illusion to the hitter, but not due to
peripheral vision.

“Hitters are seeing the ball with both eyes, not out of the side of
front eye as suggested,” said Schmidt. “I believe the illusion is a
result of the speed with which the action takes place, not a peripheral
view. Then again, I’m not a scientist, just a hitter.”

Well, not just a hitter. Thanks to SPORTSbyBROOKS for this story.

Albert Pujols hit his 597th career home run

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Angels DH Albert Pujols smacked his 597th career home run, a two-run shot in the top of the first inning during Wednesday night’s 5-2 loss to the Rays. The blast was off of Erasmo Ramirez and marked No. 6 on the season for the future Hall of Famer.

Pujols finished 1-for-3 with the homer and a walk. After Wednesday’s game, he’s hitting a lackluster .244/.296/.378 with 34 RBI and 14 runs scored in 186 trips to the plate.

Pujols currently ranks ninth on baseball’s all-time leaderboard and is three shy of joining the 600-homer club. He’s currently 13 home runs away from tying Sammy Sosa for eighth all-time.

Chris Sale’s streak of starts with at least 10 strikeouts ends

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Red Sox starter Chris Sale entered Wednesday’s outing against the Rangers with at least 10 strikeouts in eight consecutive starts, tying a record he already shared with Pedro Martinez. He failed do break the record, racking up only six strikeouts in 7 1/3 innings. Fortunately, the Red Sox scored seven runs in the bottom of the seventh to put him in line for the win. Sale gave up four runs (three earned) on six hits and a walk.

After Wednesday’s outing, Sale is sitting on a 2.34 ERA with a 101/14 K/BB ratio in 73 innings. So far, so good for the Red Sox, who acquired Sale from the White Sox in December.

Sale previously racked up 10 strikeouts in eight consecutive games between May 23 and June 30 in 2015 with the White Sox. Pedro Martinez accomplished the feat for the Red Sox between August 19 and September 27 in 1999.