Adenhart's driver was DUI too

Leave a comment

From the O.C. Register:

An autopsy report showed Courtney Frances Stewart had a
blood-alcohol content above the legal limit for someone her age when
the car she was driving was struck by an alleged drunken driver on
April 9, prosecutors said . . . Toxicology tests conducted by the
Orange County Coroner showed Stewart had a blood-alcohol content of
.06, said Deputy District Attorney Susan Price. The legal limit in
California for drivers under 21 is .01, while the limit for drivers 21
or older is .08.

There’s a self-serving quote from the defendant’s lawyer, in which he
says that this new information is “a big revelation.” Hardly. The fact
that Stewart was over the legal limit for people under 21 only means
that she could, if she were still alive, be charged with DUI. Her being
under the influence, however, does not mean that she did anything to
cause the crash, and for Gallo’s lawyer to push that defense would
require some evidence, beyond her mere BAC, that Stewart’s driving
contributed to the collision. The evidence that has been reported so
far, however, suggests that the driver of the other car, Andrew Gallo,
was driving at a high rate of speed and ran a red light while sporting
a blood-alcohol content of at least .19 (his reading two hours after
the crash). Jurors will be taking all of that into account. They won’t
simply look at the BAC levels of the drivers, throw their hands up in
the air and say “well, both were drunk, no harm, no foul.”

This same type of situation, you may already know, is at play in the Jim Leyritz case.
There, the driver who was killed was likewise over the legal limit.
Leyritz’s lawyer is apparently going to present evidence that her
driving, and not Leyritz’s, is what led to the accident. The BAC levels
will be relevant for that inquiry, but the matter of who ran the red
light and how they were otherwise driving is going to be far more

Kyle Schwarber is on a private plane en route to Cleveland

PHOENIX, AZ - APRIL 07:  Kyle Schwarber #12 of the Chicago Cubs bats against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the MLB game at Chase Field on April 7, 2016 in Phoenix, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
Getty Images

This is happening, people.

Earlier we heard Joe Maddon being non-committal about Kyle Schwarber joining the Cubs for the World Series. Now it seems pretty clear that the Cubs are committal indeed: Jon Morosi reports that Schwarber is en route to Cleveland from Arizona on a private jet and that he’s expected to DH in Game 1 tomorrow night.

Schwarber hasn’t played in a game that counted since April 7. His potent bat is could be a windfall for a Cubs team that didn’t have a game-changing option at DH in the American League park.

Schwarber lost the whole season due to a knee injury, but he hit .246/.355/.487 with 16 homers and 43 RBI in 69 games as a rookie in 2015. His big coming out party was in the playoffs, however, when he hit three homers in five postseason games while going 7-for-13 with two walks in five games.

Carlos Santana in left field? Sure, OK.

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 15:  Carlos Santana #41 of the Cleveland Indians celebrates after hitting a home run in the second inning against J.A. Happ #33 of the Toronto Blue Jays during game two of the American League Championship Series at Progressive Field on October 15, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
Getty Images

Paul Hoynes of the Cleveland Plain Dealer reports that Indians First Baseman/DH Carlos Santana shagged some flyballs in left field during the Indians’ workout today.

Sure, why not? Santana has played one game in the outfield in his major league career and that was over four years ago, but the Indians will have to play in Chicago without the DH, meaning either losing Santana’s bat or that of Mike Napoli.

It would be up to Terry Francona to decide if that happens, but ultimately I don’t think he’ll make it real and, rather, will just forget about it, because Santana’s defense out there would in no way be smooth.

I’m sorry. I’m sick today and I’m on a lot of cold medicine.