Adenhart's driver was DUI too

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From the O.C. Register:

An autopsy report showed Courtney Frances Stewart had a
blood-alcohol content above the legal limit for someone her age when
the car she was driving was struck by an alleged drunken driver on
April 9, prosecutors said . . . Toxicology tests conducted by the
Orange County Coroner showed Stewart had a blood-alcohol content of
.06, said Deputy District Attorney Susan Price. The legal limit in
California for drivers under 21 is .01, while the limit for drivers 21
or older is .08.

There’s a self-serving quote from the defendant’s lawyer, in which he
says that this new information is “a big revelation.” Hardly. The fact
that Stewart was over the legal limit for people under 21 only means
that she could, if she were still alive, be charged with DUI. Her being
under the influence, however, does not mean that she did anything to
cause the crash, and for Gallo’s lawyer to push that defense would
require some evidence, beyond her mere BAC, that Stewart’s driving
contributed to the collision. The evidence that has been reported so
far, however, suggests that the driver of the other car, Andrew Gallo,
was driving at a high rate of speed and ran a red light while sporting
a blood-alcohol content of at least .19 (his reading two hours after
the crash). Jurors will be taking all of that into account. They won’t
simply look at the BAC levels of the drivers, throw their hands up in
the air and say “well, both were drunk, no harm, no foul.”

This same type of situation, you may already know, is at play in the Jim Leyritz case.
There, the driver who was killed was likewise over the legal limit.
Leyritz’s lawyer is apparently going to present evidence that her
driving, and not Leyritz’s, is what led to the accident. The BAC levels
will be relevant for that inquiry, but the matter of who ran the red
light and how they were otherwise driving is going to be far more
relevant.

Marlins catcher J.T. Realmuto reportedly asks to be traded

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Craig Mish of MLB Network Radio is reporting that Marlins catcher J.T. Realmuto has requested a trade out of Miami. Jon Heyman is characterizing it as Realmuto telling the team that he “wouldn’t mind” a trade.

Either way, Realmuto has no power to force a trade. This isn’t the NBA or something. Still, it’s evidence of just how dreary a prospect remaining in Miami is for Marlins veterans in the wake of trades that sent Giancarlo Stanton to New York, Marcell Ozuna to St. Louis.

Realmuto, who will turn 27 just before the 2018 season, hit .278/.332/.451 with 17 homers, 65 RBI, and eight steals over 141 games this past season. He only has three years of service time and is arbitration eligible for the first time this offseason. He made just $562K in the 2017 and will get a big raise this year, but he’s still going to be underpaid based on his production. If the Marlins wanted to trade him, they’d get a nice return. Why they would want to trade him, I have no idea.

Expect more of this sort of thing as the Marlins slash payroll and make it clear that their immediate priorities are more about saving money and less about winning baseball games. Which may or may not be a valid goal for the team’s new owners, but is certainly a letdown for baseball players and fans.