Yankee Stadium home run binge explained

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Looking for an explanation for all of the homers in Yankee Stadium? It’s the walls, stupid:

After analyzing the 29 games played and the 105 home runs hit at the
new Yankee Stadium, AccuWeather.com has determined that a portion of
the home run derby that has taken place this season cannot be directly
attributed to the weather. As it turns out, walls, not weather, are the
homer helpers for 19 percent of the home runs thus far in the new
Yankee Stadium.

The difference is in the dimensions. For someone attending a game at
the new Yankee Stadium, or watching on TV, the size of the playing
field appears to be the same. The dimensions at select corners of the
field are identical – and the posted numbers on the walls reflect that.
However, detailed schematics of the park reveal some nuances that have
significant implications.

Specifically, AccuWeather notes that the change from a curved to a flat
wall in right field to accommodate a new scoreboard causes the fence to
jog in between four and nine feet. As a result, AccuWeather calculates
that that 20 of the 105 home runs would not have flown out of the old
stadium. Over the course of the season, that will account for 56 homers
that would have fallen short of the fence in the old joint. That’s not
an insignificant number of home runs.

What to do about it? Well, returning the wall to Old Yankee Stadium
dimensions would require removing a couple of rows of seats, it would
seem, and if we know anything about the Yankees, we know that they’re
not about to sacrifice a revenue stream. And it’s not as if there’s
much room to move home plate back, as it’s already very close to the
wall as it is.

Eureka! Remove the seats behind home plate! It’s not as if anyone is sitting there anyway . . .

Mets may move Asdrubal Cabrera to second base upon return from DL

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Newsday’s Marc Carig reports that the Mets may move Asdrubal Cabrera to second base when he returns from the disabled list. Cabrera has been on the disabled list since June 13 with a sprained left thumb, but he’s expected to be activated on Friday.

Cabrera, 31, last played second base in 2014 with the Nationals. He has played shortstop exclusively as a Met the last two seasons. Jose Reyes would continue to play shortstop if the Mets were to go through with the position change. Cabrera would displace T.J. Rivera, who has been playing second base in place of the injured Neil Walker.

In 196 plate appearances this season, Cabrera is hitting .244/.321/.392 with six home runs and 20 RBI. He has made 11 defensive errors, which is tied for the third-most among shortstops behind Tim Anderson (16) and Dansby Swanson (12).

Corey Knebel sets modern record for consecutive appearances with a strikeout

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Brewers closer Corey Knebel set a modern major league record for relievers to start a season, as Thursday’s appearance marked his 38th consecutive appearance with a strikeout. He set down the side in order in the ninth inning, striking Josh Bell out to start the frame.

Aroldis Chapman held the record previously, recording a strikeout in his first 37 appearances of the season in 2014 with the Reds.

Knebel, 25, has flown under the radar despite having an incredibly good season. He moved into the closer’s role in mid-May when Neftali Feliz, now a free agent, struggled. After Thursday’s appearance, Knebel is 12-for-15 in save chances with a 0.96 ERA and a 65/17 K/BB ratio in 37 2/3 innings.