Teixeira not critical to Boston's future

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Two stories about how the Red Sox missed out on getting Mark Teixeira this past offseason, one in the Boston Globe:

. . . come the end of this season, particularly if the Red Sox fail
to retain Jason Bay, the Yankees’ signing of Teixeira at the Red Sox’
expense could loom as a pivotal turning point in baseball’s fiercest
division . . . [Teixeira] might have been the centerpiece of the Boston
lineup for years to come. Given the struggles of Ortiz, the Sox’
failure to sign Teixeira now leaves them with something of a long-term
predicament offensively.

And one in the New York Times, which ties it specifically to the Sox-Yanks rivalry, with the headline “Teixeira Altered Dynamics of Red Sox-Yankees Rivalry.”

The question caused Alex Rodriguez to put his palms on the side of
his head, smile and utter, “Wow.” It was Rodriguez’s animated,
one-syllable response to how dramatically different the rivalry between
the Yankees and the Red Sox would have been if Mark Teixeira had signed
with Boston . . . The Red Sox positioned their off-season around
signing Teixeira, a player who would have fit snugly into their desire
for shrewd, patient hitters who play stellar defense. If the Red Sox
were assigned the task of building the perfect player, they would have
constructed someone who hit, fielded, walked and talked like Teixeira.

Only brief mention of the facts that (a) The Sox have yet to lose to
the Yankees this year, so the dynamics haven’t been altered that
much; (b) that the Red Sox have a really good first base prospect in
Lars Anderson; and (c) even if Anderson doesn’t pan out, it’s been a
very long time since the Red Sox were a team that allowed itself to
have gaping holes anywhere. If Bay bolts, they’ll find a way to patch
the holes and will remain competitive. That’s just what they do. So
yes, having Mark Teixeira in Boston would have changed things a bit,
but I think it’s really easy to oversell this storyline. They’ll find
someone else. They always do.

But hey, the Yankees are playing the Red Sox this week, and overselling everything that goes with that is part of the territory.

Aaron Judge’s record strikeout streak ends at 37 games

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For the first time in a month and a half, Aaron Judge went an entire game without striking out, ending his record streak at 37 games. Judge had an RBI single and three walks in Tuesday night’s 13-4 victory over the Tigers.

Judge went 1-for-4 with a solo home run and zero strikeouts in a 9-4 loss to the Brewers on July 7. Between July 8 and August 20, Judge would strike out in all 37 games, breaking the record previously held by Adam Dunn, who struck out in the first 32 games of the 2012 season. If one counted streaks extending into multiple seasons, Dunn held the record at 36 games as he struck out in his final four games in 2011 as well.

After Tuesday’s performance, Judge is now hitting .284/.417/.594 with 37 home runs, 81 RBI, and 93 runs scored in 525 plate appearances on the season. He’s had a particularly rough second half, as he entered Tuesday with a .684 OPS since the All-Star break, a far cry from his 1.139 OPS before the break.

Video: Adrian Gonzalez doubles for his 2,000th career hit

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Dodgers first baseman Adrian Gonzalez was able to get a ground ball past Pirates first baseman Josh Bell for a double leading off the top of the sixth inning of Tuesday night’s game. He would come around to score later in the inning on a Corey Seager single, breaking a 1-1 tie.

The double gave Gonzalez 2,000 hits for his career. He is the 282nd player in baseball history and the 11th active player to reach 2,000 career hits. Gonzalez also has 300 home runs, making him one of 94 players with at least 300 dingers and 2,000 hits.

Gonzalez, who was recently activated from the disabled list, entered Tuesday’s action hitting .247/.295/.330 with one home run and 25 RBI in 201 plate appearances on the season.