MLB Draft Losers

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Everyone who watched the first round on the MLB network
It was their first try, but MLB really botched this by giving us a
panel of Harold Reynolds, Josh Hart and MLB scouting bureau director
Frank Marcos, all of whom liked all 32 picks. Hart is still picking up
a paycheck from the Rangers, so he had nothing interesting to say.
Marcos was especially bad as the one supposed expert. Meanwhile,
Baseball America’s Jim Callis, who knew more about the prospects than
all three panelists put together, was shoved off into a corner
somewhere to be given 15 seconds of air-time every half hour.

N.Y. Yankees – Might the Bombers have some actual
budgetary concerns after all? The first pick, Slade Heathcott, was a
first-round talent, but the Yankees shouldn’t have to go above slot to
sign him, and they chose to shy away from expensive players later on.
Second-rounder J.R. Murphy was their only other player in Baseball
America’s top 100 and he came in at No. 95. Fifth-rounder Caleb Cotham
could be the toughest sign in the bunch. The Red Sox, in comparison,
took five top-100 players and another in Branden Kline who could have
been there. It wasn’t about opportunity: the Red Sox had just one more
pick, that being a third-rounder. Of course, it’s possible that the
Yankees are merely saving up for the international signing period.

Atlanta – With the highest pick they’ve had since 1991,
the Braves suddenly chose to play it safe and draft a potential third
or fourth starter in Vanderbilt lefty Mike Minor. Granted, the draft
didn’t have a ton of high upside players, but there were plenty of
intriguing high school arms on the table and it was stunning that the
Braves didn’t grab one of them. Minor was just the second collegiate
they drafted in the first round since Mike Kelly in 1991, the other
being Joey Devine in 2005. Incredibly, you have to go back to 1978 and
first overall pick Bob Horner to come up with the last collegiate
first-rounder to turn in a nice career for the Braves.

Max Stassi – Stassi was viewed by many as the top catcher
in the draft, yet his bonus demands knocked him into the fourth round,
where he was taken by the A’s. He’s hardly Oakland’s only potential
tough sign, so he’s probably UCLA bound.

Kyle Schwarber is on a private plane en route to Cleveland

PHOENIX, AZ - APRIL 07:  Kyle Schwarber #12 of the Chicago Cubs bats against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the MLB game at Chase Field on April 7, 2016 in Phoenix, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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This is happening, people.

Earlier we heard Joe Maddon being non-committal about Kyle Schwarber joining the Cubs for the World Series. Now it seems pretty clear that the Cubs are committal indeed: Jon Morosi reports that Schwarber is en route to Cleveland from Arizona on a private jet and that he’s expected to DH in Game 1 tomorrow night.

Schwarber hasn’t played in a game that counted since April 7. His potent bat is could be a windfall for a Cubs team that didn’t have a game-changing option at DH in the American League park.

Schwarber lost the whole season due to a knee injury, but he hit .246/.355/.487 with 16 homers and 43 RBI in 69 games as a rookie in 2015. His big coming out party was in the playoffs, however, when he hit three homers in five postseason games while going 7-for-13 with two walks in five games.

Carlos Santana in left field? Sure, OK.

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 15:  Carlos Santana #41 of the Cleveland Indians celebrates after hitting a home run in the second inning against J.A. Happ #33 of the Toronto Blue Jays during game two of the American League Championship Series at Progressive Field on October 15, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
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Paul Hoynes of the Cleveland Plain Dealer reports that Indians First Baseman/DH Carlos Santana shagged some flyballs in left field during the Indians’ workout today.

Sure, why not? Santana has played one game in the outfield in his major league career and that was over four years ago, but the Indians will have to play in Chicago without the DH, meaning either losing Santana’s bat or that of Mike Napoli.

It would be up to Terry Francona to decide if that happens, but ultimately I don’t think he’ll make it real and, rather, will just forget about it, because Santana’s defense out there would in no way be smooth.

I’m sorry. I’m sick today and I’m on a lot of cold medicine.