The Astros are gouging their fans

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From the Department of Things I Did Not Know:

Major League Baseball does all it can to get recession-strapped fans
through the turnstiles, a day at 29 of 30 MLB ballparks includes the
option of bringing your own sandwiches, snacks, bottled water, soft
drinks or, in some cases, all of the above. That leaves the Astros, and
their stance on the matter is stated in their A-to-Z fan guide for
Minute Maid Park.

“Visitors may not bring food or beverage items into the ballpark,” it says.

was shocked to read that the Astros are the only club that does not
allow outside food. I was even more shocked at how pathetic the Astros’
justifications for this policy truly are. Owner Drayton McClane says
that banning outside food at Astros games “has been kind of a tradition
in Houston.” Yeah, it would take someone with some real power to change
such a beloved and time-honored tradition like that. Someone like, oh,
I don’t know, THE TEAM’S OWNER.

But maybe McLane is just a big
picture guy who was caught off guard by the question. Maybe there
exists some real business justifications for such an out-of-step and
fan un-friendly policy. Let’s hear from the Astros’ President of
Business Operations, Pam Gardner:

As for the Astros, Pam
Gardner, the team’s president for business operations, said the team
has opted to provide less expensive tickets rather than following suit
with other teams regarding food and beverage rules. “Our financial
model, dating back to the Astrodome, was dependent on a number of
revenue areas, including food and beverage,” Gardner said in an e-mail.
“We elected to make our appeal to fans in the form of a $7 and $1
ticket every day. I don’t think you will find many teams offering a $1

And she’s right about that. What she leaves out, however, is that according to the most recent Team Marketing Report,
the Astros actually have the tenth highest average ticket price among
all Major League teams at $28.73 a pop (the average, pulled up by the
Yankees, is $26.64). That represents a nearly 4% increase over last
year, despite the bad economy and the lackluster roster. It’s also
worth noting that the Astros sport above average prices for soft
drinks, hot dogs, parking and programs. So sure, cherry pick those few
cheap seats you’re offering, but you’re still charging people more on
average for their tickets and higher prices for the hot dogs and Mr.
Pibb you’re peddling.

What else ya got, Ms. Gardner?

also noted that the Astros’ relationship with Aramark, which operates
concessions and/or premium food services at 13 MLB parks, including
Minute Maid, “is predicated on their exclusivity on food and beverage.”

Actually, the article is wrong about that. Aramark operates in fifteen Major League stadiums.
And they have no problem working in fourteen that allow outside food.
Sure, I’ll grant that the seemingly powerless Mr. McClane might cave to
Aramark on this point faster than the savvy Peter Angelos in Baltimore
or John Henry in Boston, but he does have the tough and decptive Ms.
Gardner working for him, so I have to assume that if they really wanted
to push back on the terms of the Aramark deal they could.

A weak
showing all-around, Houston. Quit being cheap and let your fans bring
in a bottle of water or a peanut butter sandwich for crying out loud.

Blue Jays have to beat Hamels after losing Game 1

David Price
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With their rented ace on the mound and the home crowd riled up, this was supposed to be the Blue Jays’ game. After all, they’re the one overwhelming favorite to win their LDS. Well, they were. After a 5-3 loss to the Rangers on Thursday, the Blue Jays face an uphill climb to advance in the best-of-five series.

It’s not over, obviously. For one thing, the Blue Jays get to face left-handers in at least two of the next three games, and the Jays destroy southpaws. The Jays will have the pitching advantages in Texas after Friday’s Game 2 showdown against Cole Hamels, and they’ll probably have a sharper David Price out there next time if the series goes five games.

How Toronto’s lineup shapes up in the coming days will hinge on the health of Josh Donaldson and Jose Bautista. Donaldson passed his initial concussion tests after colliding with Rougned Odor‘s knee, but he’d be far from the first player to experience lasting effects after initially getting the all clear. Bautista, too, is expected to be ready to play Friday after leaving with a hamstring cramp. At this point, there’s no reason to suspect that the Jays are understating the extent of the problem.

If Donaldson is fine, the Jays will have a much better chance of taking down Hamels. Game 2 starter Marcus Stroman has looked outstanding since returning from his torn ACL, and he should be able to hold down the Rangers’ offense better than Price did. He might not even have to face Adrian Beltre, who left Thursday’s game with a back problem.

The Rangers have yet to announce the rest of their rotation, though it sounds like Martin Perez is the favorite to get the ball opposite Marco Estrada in Game 3. It would then be either Colby Lewis, Derek Holland or Yovani Gallardo on three days’ rest in Game 4 (with the Jays starting knuckleballer R.A. Dickey). Lewis seems the more likely choice because of Holland’s inconsistency and the Jays’ dominance of left-handers. Those would both be winnable games for Toronto.

So, what it comes down to is beating Hamels. If the Jays head to Texas tied 1-1, they’re still the favorites to advance to the ALCS. If it’s 2-0 Rangers, three in a row is going to be a lot to ask.

Cubs to start Kyle Hendricks in Game 2 of NLDS vs. Cardinals

Chicago Cubs starting pitcher Kyle Hendricks delivers in the first inning of a baseball game against the Pittsburgh Pirates in Pittsburgh, Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar
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Jon Lester is lined up to pitch against John Lackey in Game 1 of the NLDS against the Cardinals on Friday, but Patrick Mooney of reports that the Cubs will start Kyle Hendricks in Game 2 on Saturday.

Hendricks got the nod over Jason Hammel, would could start Game 4 if he isn’t used out of the bullpen this weekend. Jake Arrieta, coming off his brilliant performance in the Wild Card game against the Pirates, is scheduled to pitch in Game 3 when the series shifts to Chicago.

Hendricks posted a 3.95 ERA and 167/43 K/BB ratio in 180 innings over 32 starts this season. He pitched well down the stretch, including back-to-back scoreless outings to finish the regular season. That ultimately gave him the edge over Hammel, who had a 5.10 ERA during the second half.

Rangers take Game 1 of ALDS against Blue Jays

Texas Rangers's Robinson Chirinos, right, is congratulated by teammate Rougned Odor on his two-run home run against the Toronto Blue Jays in the top of the fifth inning of baseball Game 1 of the American League Division Series in Toronto on Thursday, Oct. 8, 2015. (Frank Gunn/The Canadian Press via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT
Frank Gunn/The Canadian Press via AP

With their ace on the mound in front of an electric home crowd, the Blue Jays seemingly came into Game 1 of the ALDS with the advantage over the Rangers. However, as these things often go during the playoffs, it didn’t work out that way.

Robinson Chirinos and Rougned Odor each homered off David Price as the Rangers beat the Blue Jays 5-3 in Game 1 of the ALDS on Thursday.

Price gave up five runs over seven innings in the loss. The Rangers grabbed an early 2-0 lead in the third inning before Chirinos connected for a two-run homer in the fifth. Odor added a solo blast in the seventh inning for some insurance. Playoff success continues to elude Price. He’s now owns a 4.54 ERA in the postseason and is 0-6 as a starter.

Yovani Gallardo got the win after holding the powerful Toronto lineup to two runs over five innings. Jose Bautista took Keone Kela deep in the sixth inning to draw the Blue Jays closer, but Jake Diekman followed with two perfect frames before Sam Dyson tossed a scoreless ninth inning for the save.

A big story in this game was injuries to key players. The Rangers lost Adrian Beltre in the third inning due to lower back stiffness. Meanwhile, Josh Donaldson exited for precautionary reasons in the fifth inning after he took a knee to the head on a takeout slide. The Blue Jays announced that Donaldson passed concussion protocol, but will be reevaluated Friday. Jose Bautista also exited the game after eight innings due to cramping in his right hamstring, but he’s expected to be OK.

Game 2 will take place Friday afternoon at 12:30 p.m. ET. Cole Hamels will pitch for the Rangers while Marcus Stroman will attempt to keep the Blue Jays from going down 0-2 in the series.