Quote of the Day: 'Why they're so horse [expletive]'

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Ozzie Guillen, on the White Sox’s struggles offensively:

If this was the 1980s, [none] of these guys would be in the big
leagues right now because if you hit .210-.230 and you can’t execute, I
don’t think you should be out here. When you can’t bunt, hit-and-run,
squeeze and move the guy over, you better hit 40 home runs and drive in
140. Is the clubhouse closed? We should open it and let them


why they’re so horse [expletive]. I talked to them. One thing about it:
Good teams win games. Bad teams have meetings. Well, I think we’re to
the point of having a lot of meetings. That’s all I can say.

Guillen could definitely “bunt, hit-and-run, squeeze, and move the guy
over” during his 16-year playing career, ranking among the league’s top
10 in sacrifices eight times, so he’s probably immune from his own rant
about guys with poor batting averages not belonging in the big leagues.

Still, the whole thing is pretty amusing considering that Guillen
hit .264/.287/.338 for his career and was basically one of the worst
hitters in baseball for two decades. In fact, from 1985-2000 he had the
worst on-base percentage and third-worst OPS of any player in baseball
with at least 3,500 plate appearances.

I’m a big Ozzie fan and managers certainly don’t need to have been
great players themselves to criticize their team, but talking about
what would happen to horrible hitters in the 1980s probably isn’t his
strongest suit.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.