Former No. 1 pick pleads guilty to assault on draft day

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With the Nationals just hours away from making Stephen Strasburg the
latest No. 1 pick, one of the biggest top-of-the-draft busts of all
time is pleading guilty today to four misdemeanor counts of battery.

Matt Bush went No. 1 overall in the 2004 draft because the Padres were
trying to save money, so they selected the local high-school star while
passing on the likes of Justin Verlander, Jered Weaver, and Stephen
Drew. Bush was a disaster from Day 1, getting into a bar fight before
even making his pro debut and then hitting .192 at rookie-ball.

He moved up to Single-A in 2005 and hit .221/.279/.276, missed most
of 2006 with a broken ankle, hit .204/.310/.276 at Single-A in 2007,
and was then converted from shortstop to pitcher as the Padres tried to
salvage some value from the blown pick. It didn’t work, as a torn elbow
ligament put a quick end to his time on the mound.

Bush’s guilty plea today stems from what the San Diego Union-Tribune
calls a “drunken assault” on lacrosse players at his old high school,
which caused the Padres to drop him from the 40-man roster in February
to make room for Cliff Floyd. Toronto picked up Bush only to release
him six weeks later for another drunken incident involving the alleged
harassment of a woman.

And now he’s a 23-year-old with an impotent bat and blown-out elbow
facing “at least three years of probation” and a court-mandated stint
in alcohol rehab. But hey, at least the Padres saved about $900,000 in
bonus money! San Diego picks No. 3 overall tonight and will try to avoid a Bush-like disaster with Strasburg and the consensus top hitter, Dustin Ackley, likely off the board.

Matt Harvey has a 13.19 ERA since coming back from the disabled list

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Matt Harvey‘s season was mostly a loss due to extended time on the disabled list. He’s been given a chance, however, to end the season strong and make a case for himself in the Mets’ future plans. Unfortunately, he has been unable to make that case. He was shelled again last night, and his late season opportunity has been a disaster.

Last night Harvey gave up seven runs on 12 hits and struck out only two batters in four innings against a Marlins team that, until facing him anyway, had been reeling. It was his fourth start since going on the shelf in mid-June and in those four starts he’s allowed 21 runs, all earned, on 32 hits in 14.2 innings, for an ERA of 13.19. In that time he’s struck out only eight batters while walking seven. His average fastball velocity, while ticking up slightly in each of his past four starts, is still below 95. Back when he was an ace he was consistently above that. His command has been terrible.

Injury is clearly the culprit. He had Tommy John surgery just as he was reaching his maximum level of dominance in 2013. While he came back strong in 2015, he was used pretty heavily for a guy with a brand new ligament. Last year he was felled by thoracic outlet syndrome and this year a stress injury to his shoulder. Any one of those ailments have ended pitchers’ careers and even among those who bounce back from them, many are diminished. To go through all three and remain dominant is practically unheard of.

Yet this is where Matt Harvey is. He’s 28. He’s still arbitration eligible, for a team that is, to put it politely, sensitive to large financial outlays. While his 4-5 start opportunity to end the year may very well have been seen as a chance to shop Harvey to another team, his trade value is at an all-time low. It would not be shocking if, on the basis of his recent ineffectiveness, the Mets considered non-tendering him this offseason, making him a free agent.

Someone would probably take a chance on him because famous names who once showed tremendous promise are often given multiple chances in the big leagues (See, Willis, Dontrelle). But at the moment, there is nothing in Harvey’s game to suggest that he is capable of taking advantage of such a chance. All one can hope is that an offseason of rest and conditioning will allow Harvey to reclaim at least a portion of his old form.

Noah Syndergaard is concerned about climate change

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Mets starter Noah Syndergaard has been on the disabled list for most of the season so it’s not like “sticking to baseball” is an option for him. The man has a lot of time on his hands. And, given that he’s from Texas, he is obviously paying attention to the flooding and destruction brought by Hurricane Harvey and its fellow storms in recent weeks.

Last night the self-described “Texan Republican” voiced concern over something a lot of Republicans don’t tend to talk about much openly: climate change and the Paris Agreement:

The existence of Karma and its alleged effects are above my pay grade, but the other part he’s talking about is the Trump Administration’s decision, announced at the beginning of June, to pull out of the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement on climate change mitigation. Withdrawal from it was something Trump campaigned on in 2016 on the basis that “The Paris accord will undermine the economy,” and “put us at a permanent disadvantage.” The effective date for withdrawal is 2020, which Syndergaard presumably knows, thus the reference to Karma.

Trump and Syndergaard are certainly entitled to their views on all of that. It’s worth noting that climate experts and notable think tanks like the Brookings Institution strongly disagree with Trump’s position with respect to tradeoffs and impacts, both economic and environmental. At the same time it’s difficult to find much strong sentiment in favor of pulling out of the Paris Agreement outside of conservative political outlets, who tend to find themselves in the distinct minority when it comes to climate change policy.

I’m not sure what a poll of baseball players would reveal about their collective views on the matter, but we now have at least one datapoint.