Fenway is a shrine; Tiger Stadium, a pile of rubble

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On the day after the final act in the Tiger Stadium drama came to pass, it’s helpful to remember that it didn’t have to be this way:

the smallest ballpark in the majors, many seats are obstructed behind
poles, it’s crammed into a small city block, and there is no room
around the concession stands. And yet, the stadium that is home to the
Boston Red Sox, has become a landmark beloved by fans and is thriving
in the struggling economy . . .

. . . Built in 1912,
Fenway is three years shy of its 100th birthday. Lacking the amenities
featured in many new stadiums, the park relies on old-fashioned
nostalgia to help sell tickets and incite excitement among fans. “They
have managed to tell people that while all the rest of the modern world
is basking in this comfort and luxury, you don’t come to a ballgame to
be comfortable. You come to a ballgame to see the ballgame,” said Ryan.

One of the things I’ll always wonder is what would have
happened if Tigers’ owner Mike Ilitch had sunk some money into a
thoughtful renovation of Tiger Stadium instead of trying to keep up
with the Joneses and build a shiny new park.

I’ll grant that the
Detroit economy was and will remain terrible, and I’ll also grant that
it’s probably harder to sell nostalgia to someone who visits Detroit to
gamble than to someone who comes back to Boston to see the old college
campus, but they could have at least tried.

Mike Trout has yet to strike out this spring

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Everyone is well aware of how good Angels outfielder Mike Trout is at the game of baseball. The 26-year-old is already an all-time great, having won two MVP awards — and arguably deserving of two others — and the 2012 Rookie of the Year Award. He has accrued 54.2 WAR, per Baseball Reference, which is right around the threshold for a Hall of Fame career. Trout does it all: he draws walks, he hits for average, he hits for power, he steals bases, he plays good defense.

But here’s an achievement that is amazing even for a player like Trout: he has yet to strike out this spring. In 41 Cactus League plate appearances, he has 10 hits (including a triple and two homers) and six walks with zero strikeouts. Across his career, Trout has a 21.5 percent strikeout rate, right around the league average. He isn’t usually such a stickler for avoiding the punch-out, but this spring he is.

To put this in perspective, 134 players this spring have struck out at least 10 times, according to MLB.com. 938 players have struck out at least once. The only other players to have taken at least 10 at-bats without striking out this spring are Humberto Arteaga (Royals, 23 AB), Tony Cruz (Reds, 18 AB), Oscar Hernandez (Red Sox, 10 AB), and Jacob Stallings (Pirates, 18 AB).

According to Angels assistant hitting coach Paul Sorrento, the lack of strikeouts hasn’t been a conscious effort from Trout, Jeff Fletcher of the Orange County Register reports. Ho hum. The best player in baseball is apparently getting even better.