The Week Ahead: The Strasburg era begins

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Finally, it’s Stephen Strasburg time.

On Tuesday, the man with the million-dollar arm (or $50 million, if
Scott Boras gets his way) will be the first player selected in the
First-Year Player Draft.

After months of hype and wonder over Strasburg, he of the 100-mph
fastball and ridiculous control, he’ll finally be a pro. Well not
exactly. He’ll have to sign first, and don’t expect that to happen
quickly. But you get the point.

The MLB draft obviously doesn’t compare to the NFL or the NBA when
it comes to hype and excitement, but the presence of Strasburg, the
greatest pitching prospect since — well maybe, ever? – should make Tuesday fun.

After the Nats make him the top pick, things will get a little more
complicated, as teams stock up on more mortal talents like Dustin
Ackley and Aaron Crow.

You can see a nice mock draft here, and a good list of the top 33 prospects here.

There’s yet another list here.

On Tuesday, return to Circling the Bases for a recap of the draft. You’ll be able to find bios of the top players on Rotoworld.com.

Now, on to a great week of baseball action …

FIVE SERIES TO WATCH

  • Yankees at Red Sox, June 9-11: They’re the top two teams in
    the AL East, fierce rivals, and longtime antagonists. Their fans hate
    each other even more than the players do. What’s not to like?
  • Phillies at Mets, June 9-11:
    These two teams have been trying to create their own version of Red
    Sox-Yankees. And while it hasn’t reached that level, it still makes for
    some entertaining baseball. It helps, too, that they’re No. 1 and 2 in
    the NL East.
  • Mets at Yankees, June 12-14: In the latest version of the Subway Series, these two teams bring their rivalry to the new Yankee Stadium for the first time.
  • Red Sox at Phillies, June 12-14:
    Could this be a preview of the World Series? Way too early to say, of
    course, but it’s an interesting idea to think about. Also gives Boston
    a chance to rest Big Papi.
  • Dodgers at Rangers, June 12-14: Heck, maybe THIS matchup is a
    World Series preview. The Dodgers are dominating the NL, and the
    Rangers just keep on making fools out of everyone who expects them to
    start losing.

    ON THE TUBE

    Monday, 7:05 p.m. ET: Rays at Yankees (ESPN)
    Wednesday, 7:10 p.m.: Yankees at Red Sox (ESPN)
    *Saturday, 4:10 p.m.: Cardinals at Indians (FOX)
    *Saturday, 4:10 p.m.: White Sox at Brewers (FOX)
    *Saturday, 4:10 p.m.: Mets at Yankees (FOX)
    Sunday, 1 p.m.: Mets at Yankees (TBS)
    Sunday, 8:05 p.m.: Cardinals at Indians (ESPN)

    *Check local listings

    And finally, for some fantasy tips for this week, click here.

  • Twins pitcher barfs before almost every appearance

    NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 18:  Ryan O'Rourke #61 of the Minnesota Twins reacts after loading up the bases in the seventh inning against the New York Yankees on August 18, 2015 at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx borough of New York City.  (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
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    Twins righty Ryan O'Rourke has pitched in 54 big league games. He has barfed before almost every one of them.

    No, really:

    Through his first 54 big-league outings over the last past two years, O’Rourke estimates he emptied the contents of his stomach close to every time.

    “I don’t do it in the public’s eye,” O’Rourke said Tuesday. “I go in the bathroom, or sometimes it’s just on the back of the mound. But, yeah, it happens.”

    I wonder if I’ve barfed 54 times in my entire life. I doubt I have. Then again, I’m not doing anything in front of tens of thousands of people with potentially millions of dollars at stake.

    Yet he who is without sin hurl the first, um. Well, never mind.

    The new intentional walk rule isn’t a big deal but it’s still dumb

    PHOENIX, AZ - JUNE 06:  Anthony Recker #20 of the New York Mets calls for an intentional walk as Paul Goldschmidt #44 of the Arizona Diamondbacks looks on during the eighth inning at Chase Field on June 6, 2015 in Phoenix, Arizona.  (Photo by Norm Hall/Getty Images)
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    Let us preface this by stipulating that the new rule in which pitchers will no longer have to throw four balls to issue an intentional walk is not a big deal, objectively speaking. Teams don’t issue many IBBs to begin with. A couple a week, maybe? Fewer? Moreover, the times when a pitcher tosses one to the backstop or a batter reaches out and smacks a would-be intentional ball may be a lot of fun, but they’re extraordinarily rare. You can go years without seeing it happen.

    So, yes, the intentional walk rule announced yesterday is of negligible consequence. We’ll get used to it quickly and it will have little if any impact on actual baseball. It won’t do what it’s supposed to do — speeding up games — but it won’t harm anything that is important either.

    But let us also stipulate that the new rule is dumb.

    It’s dumb because it’s a solution in search of a problem. Pace of play is a concern, but to listen to Rob Manfred and his surrogates in the media tell it, it’s The Most Pressing Issue of Our Time. Actually, it’s not. No one is abandoning baseball because of 5-15 minutes here or there and no one who may be interested in it is ceasing their exploration of the game because of it. And even if they were, IBBs are rare and they’re not time-consuming to begin with, so it’s not something that will make a big difference. It’s change for change’s sake and so Rob Manfred can get some good press for looking like a Man of Action.

    It’s also dumb because it’s taking something away, however small it is. One of my NBC coworkers explained it well this morning:

    I agree. Shamelessness is a pretty big problem these days, so let’s not eliminate shame when it is truly due.

    Picture it: it’s a steamy Tuesday evening in late July. The teams are both way below .500 and are probably selling off half of their lineup next week. There are, charitably, 8,000 people in the stands. The game is already dragging because of ineptitude and an understandable lack of urgency on the part of players who did not imagine nights like this when they were working their way to the bigs.

    Just then, one of the managers — an inexperienced young man who refuses to deviate from baseball orthodoxy because, gosh, he might get a hard question from a sleepy middle aged reporter after the game — holds up four fingers for the IBB. The night may be dreary, but dammit, he’s going to La Russa the living hell out of this game.

    That man should be booed. Boo this man. The drunks and college kids who paid, like, $11 to a season ticket holder on StubHub to get into this godforsaken game have earned the right to take their frustrations out on Hunter McRetiredBackupCatcher for being a wuss and calling for the IBB. It may be the only good thing that happens to them that night, and now Rob Manfred would take that away from them. FOR SHAME.

    And don’t forget about us saps at home, watching this garbage fire of a game because it beats reading. We’re now going to have to listen to this exchange, as we have listened to it EVERY SINGLE NIGHT since the 2017 season began:

    Play-by-Play Guy: “Ah, here we go. They’re calling for the intentional walk. Now, in case you missed it, this is the way we’re doing it now. The new rule is that the manager — yep, right there, he’s doing it — can hold up four fingers to the home plate umpire and — there it goes — he points to first base and the batter takes his base.”

    Color Commentator, Who played from 1975-87, often wearing a mustache: “Don’t like it. I don’t like it at all. There was always a chance the pitcher throws a wild pitch. It happened to us against the Mariners in 1979 [Ron Howard from “Arrested Development” voice: it didn’t] and it has taken away something special from the game. I suppose some number-cruncher with a spreadsheet decided that this will help speed up the game, but you know what that’s worth.

    No matter what good or bad the rule brings, this exchange, which will occur from April through September, will be absolutely brutal. Then, in October, we get to hear Joe Buck describe it as if we never heard it before because Fox likes to pretend that the season begins in October.

    Folks, it’s not worth it. And that — as opposed to any actual pro/con of the new rule — is why it is dumb. Now get off my lawn.