Is Big Papi poised to break out?

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David Ortiz has a six-game hitting streak. It’s modest as these things
go — he’s 7 for 25 with a double and a homer that someone described to
me as a cheapie — but .280 over six games is nothing to sneeze at when
you’re having the kind of year Ortiz is.

Now comes someone — specifically Will Moller at The Yankee Dollar blog — suggesting that maybe Ortiz is about to turn the corner due to the fact that his BABIP is way, way lower than one would expect given how many line drives he’s hitting:

If Ortiz was .030 above or below his expected BABIP, I’d be inclined
to view it as mostly statistical noise. .100 is absurd. He’s still
making contact, and he’s putting balls in play, hard . . . A deeper
analysis would probably uncover that Ortiz has a bigtime hole in his
swing that didn’t exist before, that is being exploited by opposing
pitchers. But it’s bizarre to see a player suddenly hitting a ton more
line drives, walking less, and striking out more . . . Long story
short: Big Papi is going to stop being the butt of so many jokes before
the year is out.

I’m savvy enough to understand that flukey-strange BABIP numbers like
that are often signs that bad luck is afoot, but going much further
than that is above my pay grade. And the increased strikeouts/fewer
walks Moller notices could be evidence that Papi is just being
challenged way more than most players now, and that his guesses are
simply getting slightly better.

It continues to strike me, however, that Ortiz can’t keep this
April-May performance up forever and that some sort of improvement has
to happen. Perhaps what Moller noticed here is evidence that that
improvement is already occurring, even if we haven’t really seen it
reflected in the box score as of yet.

Astros’ bullpen throws combined one-hitter for MLB-best 30th win

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The Astros’ bullpen did yeoman’s work in place of the injured Dallas Keuchel on Monday against the Tigers. Keuchel is temporarily sidelined with a pinched nerve in his neck.

Brad Peacock made the spot start, limiting the Tigers to one hit and two walks with eight strikeouts over 4 1/3 innings. Chris Devenski took over with one out in the fifth, finishing out that inning as well as the sixth and seventh, facing the minimum. Will Harris pitched a perfect eighth and Ken Giles closed out the 1-0 victory in the ninth. Devenski, Harris, and Giles each had two strikeouts.

The Astros scored their only run in the bottom of the first inning as George Springer drew a leadoff walk, then scored on Jose Altuve‘s one-out double. Tigers starter Brad Fulmer pitched well enough to win on most days, giving up the lone run in seven frames.

After Monday’s win, the Astros became the first team to reach 30 wins, sitting on a 30-15 record. With a +55 run differential, even their expected record matches up with their actual record.

Brandon Phillips hit his 200th career home run

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Braves second baseman Brandon Phillips became the 337th player in baseball history to hit 200 career home runs, driving a solo home run to left-center field during Monday night’s home game against the Pirates. Phillips is the 14th second baseman (who played a min. of 75 percent of his career games at the position) to rack up at least 200 career home runs.

Phillips, 35, entered Monday’s action batting .290/.345/.405 with two home runs and 12 RBI in 142 plate appearances. If he’s anything, he’s consistent, as he finished with an adjusted OPS between 90-99 (100 is average) every year between 2012-16 and it was sitting at 97 coming into Monday.