Wells said no to HGH use

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Surprise, surprise. According to Ed Eagle of MLB.com,
during an injury-riddled 2001 season, David Wells said that White Sox
teammate Jose Canseco advised him to use human growth hormone. Wells,
who was 38 at the time, passed on the advice.

“I didn’t need to do that and I wasn’t going to do that. That stuff is not good for the game and it is not good for your body.”

Wells instead opted for back surgery, quit drinking and underwent an
intense offseason workout program that had him lose 30 pounds by Spring
Training in 2002. Wells enjoyed one of his best seasons with the
Yankees in 2002, going 19-7 with a 3.75 ERA and 1.24 WHIP. Wells
retired in 2007 with 239 wins, tied with Hall of Famer Mordecai Brown
for 56th on the all-time list.

Appearing at Yankee Stadium last month for the 11th anniversary of his perfect game, Wells suggested that baseball should give harsher penalties or even lifetime bans to those who test postive for PEDs.

“Just ban them right out of the
get-go; I think that would be great. No 50-game suspension. Ban them
right away, that would stop it in a heartbeat — especially with the
money they are giving out today. It would be incredible if they did
that. You wouldn’t have to worry about steroids or HGH.”

As he told reporters at Yankee Stadium last month, Wells believes that
any player who tests positive or admitted to steroid use should not be
admitted to the Hall of Fame. It’s almost comical, really, but Wells
just might be the perfect leader for an anti-performance enhancing drug
movement, proof-positive that a player can have a long-lasting and
decorated career without looking like an Adonis.

Report: Mets have discussed a Matt Harvey trade with at least two teams

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Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that the Mets have discussed a trade involving starter Matt Harvey with at least two teams. Apparently, the Mets were even willing to move Harvey for a reliever.

The Mets tendered Harvey a contract on December 1. He’s entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility and will likely see a slight bump from last season’s salary of $5.125 million. As a result, there was some thought going into late November that the Mets would non-tender Harvey.

Harvey, 28, made 18 starts and one relief appearance last year and had horrendous results. He put up a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92 2/3 innings. Between his performance, his impending free agency, and his injury history, the Mets aren’t likely to get much back in return for Harvey. Even expecting a reliever in return may be too lofty.

Along with bullpen help, the Mets also need help at second base, first base, and the outfield. They don’t have many resources with which to address those needs. Ackert described the Mets’ resources as “a very limited stash of prospects” and “limited payroll space.”