Tom Glavine: Braves 'were hoping I got hurt'

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Tom Glavine finally spoke
about being released by the Braves during a radio interview this
morning, saying that he was “blindsided” by the move and feels the team
was hoping he would suffer a setback in his recovery from shoulder
surgery so “that would be the end of it.”

“Absolutely, they were hoping I got hurt, no question in my mind,”
Glavine said, adding that “a couple” teams have expressed interest in
signing him. According to Glavine, general manager Frank Wren told him
that “you’re not good enough to get guys out” after he tossed six
shutout innings in a rehab start Tuesday night at Single-A. Here’s more
from the 305-game winner:

Looking at the whole situation, and taking into account the amount
of time I’ve spent in this city and the amount of time I’ve spent in
baseball, there’s no question in my mind it could have been handled
better. [The Braves] don’t look at players and take into account what
they’ve done on the field, what they’ve done off the field, what
they’ve meant to the organization, what they’ve meant to the city, and
say, “Wait, these guys deserve to be treated a little bit differently
than this business model we have.”

It’s tough to really blame Glavine for feeling that he deserved better
than to be released right when he looked ready to complete his comeback
and certainly in a perfect world it would have been nice if the Braves
could have provided him an opportunity to end his Hall of Fame career
in style.

At the same time, the Braves are fighting to get above .500 and stay
in contention, and top prospect Tommy Hanson is ready to step into the
rotation while almost surely being a better pitcher than Glavine at
this stage in their respective careers. Plus, as Glavine himself
explained: “In order for them to pull this [Nate McLouth] deal off,
they had to get some money somewhere, and they got the money from
releasing me.”

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.