Rockies set to call up Carlos Gonzalez

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Earlier this week Matt Holliday talked about whether or not the A’s will end up trading him during the next two months, but in the meantime the Rockies are calling up the centerpiece of the deal that sent Holliday to Oakland.

Carlos Gonzalez is expected to join the Rockies in time for tonight’s
game after the 23-year-old, left-handed hitting outfielder batted
.339/.418/.630 with 10 homers, 29 total extra-base hits, and 59 RBIs in
48 games at Triple-A.

Those numbers are inflated quite a bit by the extremely
hitter-friendly environment at Colorado Springs, but .339/.418/.630 is
still damn good and he hit .316/.398/.541 on the road along with
.362/.439/.723 at home. Originally signed by Arizona as a 17-year-old
out of Venezuela in 2002, Gonzalez has already been the main prospect
on the move in trades for Dan Haren and Matt Holliday, which says
plenty about both his long-term upside and current flaws.

He’s hit .291 in 632 games as a minor leaguer and looks capable of
smacking 30 homers annually with Coors Field on his side, but aside
from his time at Triple-A he’s rarely walked and struck out quite a
bit, posting an ugly 446/156 K/BB ratio between rookie-ball, Single-A,
and Double-A. He also struggled mightily with the A’s last season,
hitting .242/.273/.361 with a hideous 81/13 K/BB ratio in 85 games.

On the other hand, Gonzalez has a very solid 73/44 K/BB ratio in 460
plate appearances at Triple-A, along with hitting .312/.385/.526. He’s
never going to draw a ton of walks, but if his control of the strike
zone at Triple-A is for real Gonzalez certainly looks capable of
developing above-average plate discipline and at the very least is
safely beyond the swing-at-everything career path that has doomed so
many promising prospects.

Dexter Fowler’s presence means that Gonzalez won’t be manning center
field in Colorado, but he rated well there last year according to
Ultimate Zone Rating and should be a strong defensive corner
outfielder. In terms of raw talent he’s among the most promising young
outfielders in baseball and if his newfound plate discipline is here to
stay Gonzalez’s second stint in the majors may last for a couple
decades.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.