Jim Bowden was something of a hands-off GM

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Via Deadspin, we learn that former Nats’ GM Jim Bowden recently sat down for an extended interview
in which he admits that he never once stepped foot in the Dominican
Republic despite the fact that his team ran an academy and spent
millions of dollars on talent there:

With both of those scandals originating in the Dominican Republic,
some say more diligent oversight by Bowden of the Nationals’ operations
in that country might have nipped some of the problems in the bud. But
Bowden admits in his 5 years with the franchise, he had never once
stepped foot on Dominican soil. “I sent our top executives down there
to oversee it and at no time did I ever come back with feedback from
them that there were any problems,” Bowden explains. “In retrospect, if
I had to do it again, would I go down there? Of course I would NOW. But
20-20 hindsight is easy after the fact.”

The kicker to all of this is that, as Deadspin’s Josh Levin reports,
the interview has caused ESPN to renege on an offer to let Bowden
broadcast some College World Series games. Which, given all of the
other things of which he has been accused, is most bizarre. Levin:

Considering the extent of his alleged off-field transgressions and
his proven inability to construct a baseball team, it’s bizarre that
ESPN would want to hire Bowden for any kind of assignment–maybe they
just needed someone to keep Steve Phillips company. What’s more bizarre
is that he would be deemed unfit for the broadcast booth for the crime
of being mildly candid on television.

Guessing what ESPN is going to do with this sort of thing is kind of
hopeless, I suppose. As is any team that dares give Jim Bowden a job.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.