First-third awards – NL Rookie of the Year

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I’m tempted to just skip this one, as no one is worth of the honor. Not
one NL rookie pitcher ranks in the league’s top 40 in innings pitched.
Here are the ERAs of everyone to have made at least seven starts:

Kenshin Kawakami – 4.63 ERA in 58 1/3 IP
Josh Geer – 5.44 ERA in 48 IP
Shairon Martis – 5.62 ERA in 57 2/3 IP
Jordan Zimmermann – 5.71 ERA in 52 IP
Felipe Paulino – 6.21 ERA in 42 IP

That’s it. But it’s no less impressive than the list of position players. Here’s the top 10, according to VORP.

1. Joe Thurston – 7.3
2. Ryan Roberts – 7.3
3. Ryan Hanigan – 5.1
4. Edwin Maysonet – 4.9
5. Jason Jaramillo – 4.7
6. Micah Hoffpauir – 3.7
7. Dexter Fowler – 3.6
8. Drew Macias – 3.4
9. Colby Rasmus – 3.3
10. Tyler Greene – 2.9

That 7.3 figure puts Thurston 57th overall among NL position
players. Seth Smith comes out a little higher at 7.8, but he doesn’t
technically qualify as a rookie after spending too much of last season
on Colorado’s bench.

Fowler does deserve additional credit for his defense, but he’s been
a well below average regular since his five-steal game made headlines
in late April.

So, basically, the NL Rookie of the Year candidates through one-third of the season are mostly relievers.

The top pitchers, according to VORP.

1. J.A. Happ – 14.1
2. Randy Wells – 13.3
3. Mark DiFelice – 11.6
4. Ronald Belisario – 10.6
5. Juan Gutierrez – 9.0
6. Luke Gregerson – 8.2
7. Jason Motte – 7.2
8. Dan Meyer – 6.9
9. Bobby Parnell – 6.4
10. Jesse Chavez – 6.3

Ramon Troncoso is ineligible because of the time he spent in the majors last year.

I prefer Happ for the rest of the season, but I think Wells deserves
the nod here, even if he’s gone 0-2 while posting a 1.69 ERA in his
five starts. He allowed three runs over seven innings in his worst
outing to date, and it’s hardly his fault that Kevin Gregg and Aaron
Heilman keep letting him down.

First-third NL Rookie of the Year

1. Wells
2. Happ
3. Fowler

Mike Trout has a torn thumb ligament, could require surgery

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Yesterday Mike Trout left the Marlins-Angels game after hurting his thumb while sliding head first into second base. After the game the Angels talked about it as if it were just a sprain. Trout had an MRI today, however, and the diagnosis is far worse: he has a torn thumb ligament.

While a treatment option has not yet been chosen, surgery is a possibility. A certainty is that he’ll miss, at the very least, several weeks of play. He has been placed on the disabled list for the first time in his career.

Trout, the reigning AL MVP and, without question, the best player in baseball, is batting .337/.461/.742 with 16 home runs, 36 RBI, 36 runs scored, and 10 stolen bases in 206 plate appearances this season. Even with the one of the weaker supporting casts in baseball, Trout had the Angels near .500 and in at least arguable contention in the AL West.

Without him, they are likely sunk. Without him, baseball is worse off.

Basebrawl! Harper, Strickland punch away, Nats-Giants fight

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SAN FRANCISCO — Nationals slugger Bryce Harper and San Francisco reliever Hunter Strickland both landed punches to the head during a wild brawl that erupted Monday after a hit by pitch.

Harper was hit in the right hip by Strickland’s 98 mph fastball in the eighth inning with Washington ahead 2-0.

Harper pointed the bat toward Strickland, charged the mound and fired his batting helmet wide of the pitcher. They started to swing away and they each connected as the benches and bullpens emptied.

At least two Giants players forcefully dragged Strickland from the middle of the brawl all the way into the dugout. Harper and Strickland were both ejected.

In the 2014 NL Division Series, Harper hit two home runs off Strickland. After the star’s second shot, in Game 4, he stared at Strickland as he rounded the bases.