Dick Jacobs: 1925-2009

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Former Cleveland Indians’ owner Dick Jacobs has died:

Richard E. “Dick” Jacobs, the commercial real estate mogul and
former Cleveland Indians owner who helped refurbish downtown Cleveland
and turned its baseball team into a winner, has passed away after a
lengthy illness. He was 84 . . . Although Jacobs made his fortune in
real estate, he became more widely known when he and his brother,
David, bought the Indians from the Steve O’Neill estate in late 1986.
The price was $40 million . . . Jacobs promised to run the club with
sound business fundamentals. He wanted to “stay out of the way” and
hire baseball experts to direct the team. He never told them what to
do, only that they keep him informed, operate within the budget and be

How nice would it be if every baseball owner had such a philosophy?

Jacobs’ impact on the Indians cannot be overstated. He helped bring
that team back from an oblivion most franchises have never experienced.
When the Indians are bad now, they lose some games and the crowds get
smaller. When they were bad 30 years ago — and they were always bad —
they lost way more games and virtually no one ever showed up. There’s a
reason why “Major League” was set in Cleveland, and that reason all but
disappeared after the changes Dick Jacobs made began to take hold.

I know it’s a commercial impossibility in this day and age, but if
ever there was an owner who deserved to have his name on a team’s
stadium, it’s Dick Jacobs. Progressive Insurance: the good press you’d
get by allowing the team to change the ballpark’s name back to Jacobs
Field would more than outweigh whatever benefit having your name on it
brings. Make it happen and allow the legacy of a man who did more than
almost anyone to help both the Indians and the City of Cleveland come
back from the brink to be honored.

Photo of the Day: Colby Rasmus just wants to love on everybody

Colby Rasmus

Colby Rasmus hit a big home run last night to set off the scoring and to set the tone for the Astros.

After the game he spoke to Jeff Passan of Yahoo and voiced some nice perspective and maturity as well, acknowledging that his time and St. Louis and Toronto left him with a reputation that he’d rather not have follow him around forever, saying “I don’t want them to say Colby Rasmus was a piece of crap because he had all of this time and just wanted to be a douche. I just try to love on everybody.”

Fair. By the way, this is what Rasmus looked like either just before or just after telling reporters that he “just tries to love on everybody.”


Ready for some lovin’?

There’s no one to blame in Yankees’ loss

Joe Girardi

You’re going to boo All-Star Brett Gardner for striking out against a Cy Young contender?

You’re going to bash Alex Rodriguez for going hitless in another postseason game, three years after his last one?

Maybe you’d prefer to put it all on Masahiro Tanaka for giving up two solo homers to a lineup full of 20-homer guys?

The truth is that the Yankees were supposed to lose tonight. They were facing an outstanding left-hander with their forever-lefty-heavy lineup, and they simply didn’t have anyone pitching like an ace to set themselves up nicely for a one-game, winner-take-all showdown. The 3-0 result… well, that’s how this was supposed to go down.

It didn’t necessarily mean it would; what fun would it be if the better team always won? And the Astros might not even be a better team than the Yankees. However, the Astros with Dallas Keuchel on the mound were certainly a better team than the Yankees with whoever they picked to throw.

I just don’t see where it’s worth putting any blame tonight. Joe Girardi? He could have started John Ryan Murphy over Brian McCann against the tough lefty, but he wasn’t willing to risk Tanaka losing his comfort zone by using a backup catcher.

The front office could have added more talent, perhaps outbidding the Blue Jays for David Price or the Royals for Johnny Cueto, and set themselves up better for the postseason. However, that would have cost them Luis Severino and/or Greg Bird, both of whom went on to play key roles as the Yankees secured the wild card. Would it really have been worth it? I don’t think so.

Tanaka gave the Yankees what they should have expected. Had Keuchel’s stuff been a little off on short rest, Tanaka’s performance would have kept the Yankees in the game.

Keuchel, though, was on his game from the first pitch. The Astros bullpen might have been a bit more vulnerable, and late at-bats from Gardner, Carlos Beltran, Rodriguez and McCann definitely left something to be desired. Still, on the whole, the lack of offense was quite a team effort.

The Yankees got beat by a better team tonight.  I’m not sure the Astros would have been better in Games 2-7 in a longer series, but they had everything in their favor in this one.