Who acted poorly: Glavine, or the Braves?

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As a longtime Braves fan, I was beyond angry when I heard that they had released Tom Glavine yesterday.
As a 14 year-old boy, I watched Glavine’s first start back in 1987, was
with him and the Braves through some dark, early years, rejoiced when
things unexpectedly turned around in 1991, cheered like crazy during
Game Six of the 1995 World Series, and continued to pull for him as his
career transformed from merely great to Hall of Fame worthy. Even if I
didn’t particularly enjoy his move to the Mets, I understood. Even
though I knew he wasn’t the same pitcher he used to be upon his return
to Atlanta last year, I rejoiced. Glavine doesn’t know it, but he and I
have a lot of history together, and history makes up for a lot.

So, yes, I was angry when I heard the news yesterday. Earlier this
spring I wanted Glavine to retire because it sounded like he truly
couldn’t pitch anymore, but his rehab starts sounded like they were
going well. Indeed, he pitched six scoreless innings on Tuesday night.
In light of this, and in light of all Glavine has meant to the
franchise over the past 22 years, I thought the Braves were obligated
to at least give him a chance to pitch. But they didn’t. Which was bad
enough, but it was compounded by what seemed like humiliation in light
of Glavine’s statements the evening before
that he stood ready to pitch. As it seemed motivated by money (Glavine
stood to claim $1 million for making the team) it struck me like a
particularly classless and penny wise-pound foolish way to let a future
Hall of Famer’s career end in Atlanta.

After having had a night to sleep on it, I’m still miffed over it all,
though not quite as miffed as I was yesterday. I will not dispute for a
second that the Braves are better off from a baseball perspective
having Tommy Hanson pitching than Tom Glavine. I will also fully grant
the following, offered by Braves’ GM Frank Wren:

“In low-A ball, the pitching line is not a relevant factor in whether the ‘stuff’ could get major-league hitters out”

I’m no scout and outside of the discussion of his radar readings, I’ve
heard nothing about the specific quality of his rehab starts. Maybe
he’d get shelled if he pitched for Atlanta. I don’t know.

But I do know that the only situation which could have existed to
make this something other than a callous move on the Braves’ part would
the following: Glavine is told that he’s not cutting by Braves
management and is about to be released, and then nonetheless seeks out
a reporter to make that “I’m ready” comment. In such a situation, it’s
Glavine, not the Braves forcing the issue out the way it was forced,
putting the Braves in a no-win situation. Did he do that, or did the
Braves play their cards close to the vest, encouraging him along in
rehab, allowing him to declare himself ready, and then and only then
tell him, no, you’re going to be released?

For those of us who are coming at this with some emotional baggage
as it relates to a team legend — as opposed to thinking about it in
merely analytical terms — that is the most important question.

The Rockies are promoting outfield prospect David Dahl

SAN DIEGO, CA - JULY 10:  David Dahl of the U.S. Team looks on prior to the SiriusXM All-Star Futures Game at PETCO Park on July 10, 2016 in San Diego, California.  (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)
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In a wave of prospect advancement news on Sunday, the Rockies have joined the fray. The Astros are calling up Alex Bregman. The Diamondbacks are calling up Braden Shipley. And the Rockies will call up outfield prospect David Dahl on Monday, Nick Groke of The Denver Post reports. The Rockies are expected to designate outfielder Brandon Barnes for assignment to create roster space.

Dahl, 22, was selected by the Rockies in the first round — 10th overall — in the 2012 draft. He started the season at Double-A, batting .278/.367/.500 with 13 home runs, 45 RBI, 53 runs scored, and 16 stolen bases in 322 plate appearances. He earned a promotion to Triple-A Albuquerque earlier this month. In 16 games there, Dahl has hit an outstanding .484/.529/.887 with five homers, 16 RBI, and 17 runs scored in 68 plate appearances.

Dahl is considered the Rockies’ second-best prospect and #40 overall in baseball according to MLB Pipeline. He got some camera time during the 2016 Futures Game two weeks ago, going 0-for-2.

David Robertson and adventures with the win statistic

CHICAGO, IL - JUNE 26:  David Robertson #30 of the Chicago White Sox pitches in the 9th inning for a save against the Toronto Blue Jays at U.S. Cellular Field on June 26, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois. The White Sox defeated the Blue Jays 5-2.  (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
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David Robertson got the win in both White Sox victories today, a double-header versus the Tigers. In the first game, he got the final out of the eighth inning and pitched a scoreless ninth before the White Sox walked off on an Adam Eaton RBI single.

It was the second game that made things interesting. Robertson took the mound at the start of the ninth inning staked to a 4-1 lead. He’d fork up a leadoff home run to Nick Castellanos. Then, after getting two outs, served up another solo shot to Tyler Collins followed by a game-tying Jarrod Saltalamacchia dinger. Robertson would get out of the inning without any further damage.

In the bottom of the ninth, Melky Cabrera sent the White Sox home winners again, drilling a walk-off RBI single. That gave Robertson the win, his second of the afternoon. As Baseball Tonight notes on Twitter, Robertson is the first player in the last 100 years to give up three home runs in an inning or fewer and still wind up with the victory.

Robertson has had a rough go of it since the All-Star break. He yielded four runs in his first appearance back on July 18. On the season, he’s saved 23 games in 27 appearances with a 4.46 ERA and a 50/21 K/BB ratio in 40 2/3 innings.