Jorge Posada belongs in Cooperstown

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Yesterday, Rob Neyer said this in the course of trying to identify the best catcher this decade:

So it’s Posada vs. Rodriguez in a fight to the finish. And while the
finish won’t be until October of 2009, I have a hard time believing
that Pudge can do enough in the next four months — or has done enough
with his glove and arm over the last nine seasons — to make up for
that 16-point gap in OPS+.

Ivan Rodriguez is going into the Hall of Fame. Posada isn’t, and shouldn’t; he just happens to have played the lion’s share of his fine career in a single decade.

In response, Jonah Keri mounts a defense of Posada’s Hall of Fame case:

Jorge Posada, to me, looks like a clear choice as one of the dozen
best catchers of all-time . . . I absolutely think a [Hall of Fame]
case can be made for Posada, even if he retired tomorrow . . . It’s a
shame that Posada can’t elicit more enthusiasm for his accomplishments.
Here’s hoping, nine years from now, that the other voting members of
the BBWAA are kinder to Posada than Rob will be.

It sort of kills things for me to know that Rob and Jonah are friends,
because I think it would be fun to have a nasty fight over this. As it
is, they’ll probably just marshall evidence and arguments. Oh well.

In any event, I’m leaning more to Jonah’s side of things here,
though I don’t agree that Posada would go in if he retired tomorrow.
His case is really a Carlton Fisk-style case, and my sense was that
people didn’t truly appreciate Fisk as a Hall of Famer until the
longevity portion of the argument really kicked in during his years in
Chicago. Posada has no MVP awards like Rodriguez and was never the
hitter Piazza was, but he has been a clearly above-average, and
oftentimes excellent catcher who is aging well. He’ll also get a bump
for the World Series rings which, while not as important to a Hall of
Fame case as many think it is, isn’t unimportant. Mostly though, I
think people will look back at the Yankees teams of the 90s and 2000s
and ask themselves who is worthy of induction from that crew. Torre,
Jeter and Rivera should be no-brainers. I think most will agree that
more than just those three were responsible for the extended run of
greatness. When looking to add a name or two to that list, Posada’s is
the best available in my view, and on that basis, he goes in.

Is that the most scientific reason for putting someone in the Hall
of Fame? Nah. But if we’ve learned anything over the years it’s that
Hall of Fame voting isn’t very scientific. I’ve grudgingly accepted
that, so I think I’m entitled to use a little non-scientific argument
of my own. On that basis, Jorge makes it.

Minor League Baseball established a political action committee to fight paying players more

DURHAM, NC - JULY 28:  The Chicago White Sox play the Most Valuable Prospects during the championship game of the 2011 Breakthrough Series at the Durham Bulls Athletic Park on July 28, 2011 in Durham, North Carolina.  Most Valuable Prospects won 17-2 over the Chicago White Sox. (Photo by Sara D. Davis/Getty Images)
Sara D. Davis/Getty Images
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Josh Norris of Baseball America reports that Minor League Baseball has established a political action committee to continue fighting against a lawsuit brought by a group of former minor league players seeking increased wages and back pay.

You may recall that, earlier this year, two members of Congress — Republican Brett Guthrie of Kentucky and Democrat Cheri Bustos of Illinois — introduced H.R. 5580 in the House of Representatives. Also known as the “Save America’s Pastime Act,” H.R. 5580 sought to change language in Section 13 of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. In doing so, minor leaguers wouldn’t have been covered under a law that protects workers who are paid hourly. Minor League Baseball publicly endorsed the bill. Bustos withdrew her support after receiving widespread criticism.

The whole thing started when Sergio Miranda filed a lawsuit in 2014, accusing Major League Baseball teams of colluding to eliminate competition. The lawsuit challenged the reserve clause, which binds minor leaguers into contracts with their teams for seven years. That suit was dismissed in September 2015. However, another lawsuit was filed in October last year — known as Senne vs. the Office of the Commissioner of Baseball — alleging that minor leaguers were victims of violations of state and federal minimum wage laws. Senne et. al. suffered a setback this summer when U.S. Magistrate Judge Joseph Spero of the U.S. District Court in San Francisco dismissed class certification. That essentially meant that the players could not file a class-action lawsuit. As a result, the players’ legal team led by Garrett Broshuis amended their case to only include players who play in one league for an entire season. As Norris notes, that means that the included players’ experiences are uniform enough for inclusion in a class-action lawsuit.

So that’s why Minor League Baseball established a political action committee (PAC). A PAC, for the unfamiliar, is an organization created with the intent of raising money to defeat a particular candidate, legislation, or ballot initiative. In other words, they’re getting serious and want Capitol Hill’s help.

Minor League Baseball president Stan Brand said, “Because of procedurally what has happened in the Congress and the difficulties in getting legislation, we’ve got to adjust to that. We were lucky. We had the ability because of the depth of the relationships and involvement in the communities to not have to worry about that. And now we do, I think. The PAC . . . gives us another tool to re-enforce who we are and why we’re important.”

Norris mentions in his column that Phillies minor league outfielder Dylan Cozens received the Joe Baumann Award for leading the minors with 40 home runs. That came with an $8,000 prize. Cozens said that the prize was more than he made all season. The minor league regular season spanned from April 7 to September 5, about six months. Athletes aren’t paid in the other six months which includes offseason training and spring training. They are also not paid for participating in instructional leagues and the Arizona Fall League. Minor leaguers lack union representation, which is why their fight for fair pay has been such an uphill battle.

Report: White Sox, Nationals making “strong progress” on a Chris Sale deal

CHICAGO, IL - SEPTEMBER 27:  Starting pitcher Chris Sale #49 of the Chicago White Sox deliivers the ball against the Tampa Bay Rays at U.S. Cellular Field on September 27, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois.  (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
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Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports that the White Sox and Nationals are making “strong progress” on a trade involving ace Chris Sale. Most reports coming out on Monday night suggest that a deal isn’t likely to be consummated until Tuesday at the earliest.

Sale, 27, has pitched in the majors over parts of seven seasons. He owns a career 74-50 record with a 3.00 ERA and a 1,244/260 K/BB ratio in 1,110 innings. The lefty will earn $12 million in 2017, then has a club option for 2018 worth $12.5 million with a $1 million buyout as well as a 2019 club option worth $13.5 million with a $1 million buyout. Relative to what he would earn if he were a free agent today, Sale’s remaining salary is a bargain.

The Nationals would likely have to part with several of their top prospects. MLB Pipeline lists pitcher Lucas Giolito, outfielder Victor Robles, and pitcher Reynoldo Lopez in the club’s top-three.

Adding Sale would arguably give the Nationals claim to the best starting rotation in baseball as he would join 2016 NL Cy Young Award winner Max Scherzer and Stephen Strasburg.

There are other teams in the mix for Sale. The Red Sox and Astros have also talked with the White Sox about the lefty’s services.