Before there was Strasburg, there was McDonald

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As we approach the draft, USA Today’s Bob Nightengale has an excellent story this morning about the last
Stephen Strasburg: Ben McDonald, the LSU pitcher who was the first
overall pick of the 1989 draft. Taken by the Orioles, McDonald, like
Strasburg, had ungodly stuff. McDonald, like Strasburg, was expected to
help the big club almost immediately. And most interestingly, McDonald,
like Strasburg, had Scott Boras for an agent:

“I don’t know what it’s going to be like for (Strasburg’s) family,
but for us, tough, really, really tough,” says Larry McDonald, Ben’s
father. “We took Scott Boras’ advice, and he got Ben more money than we
dreamed, but it was so tough on everyone here. Every time Scott Boras
would call, my wife would just say, ‘Oh, here’s that fancy
slick-back-haired California lawyer calling again’ ” . . . Says Rebecca
McDonald, Ben’s mother: “I sat by myself many nights on the porch just
wanting to cry. People were getting caught up in town. Some of our
friends agreed with us, some didn’t. And all Ben wanted to do was play
ball” . . . “People didn’t like Scott Boras too much back then,” Larry
McDonald says. “I guess things haven’t changed much.”

The biggest difference between Ben McDonald’s family in 1989 and
Stephen Strasburg’s family in 2009 is that there exists twenty years of
accumulated and easily accessible Scott Boras history out there, so if
they’re unhappy with his representation they only have themselves to
blame. Yes, he’s unpopular in some quarters, but he’s not coming in
under the radar or anything, and anyone who hooks up with him should
know what to expect. What shouldn’t
be expected is the $50 million that everyone seems to keep parroting. A
deal that big isn’t happening, and even Boras knows that. He’s just
throwing the number out there so that the $25 million + perks (e.g. an
opt-out clause or something) he ultimately gets from the Nationals
seems relatively reasonable.

The funniest thing about all of this is the part of this which will
probably drive Nats fans the craziest — the fact that, thanks to
Boras, no deal will get done until midnight at the August 15th signing
deadline — is likely what will protect Strasburg and the Nats the
most. The article reminds us that Ben McDonald made his Major League
debut the same summer he was drafted, which immediately followed a
spring during which his workload was extreme. While some quoted in the
article lament the fact that a pitcher’s development could be set back
by signing late, there’s no question that McDonald could have benefited
from a little rest in 1989. And who knows? If he got it, maybe he
wouldn’t have suffered so many injuries down the road.

If you’re pulling for Stephen Strasburg — and why wouldn’t you? —
I can’t think of any downside to him getting most of June, July and
August off, be it due to contentious contract negotiations or
otherwise.

Rob Manfred says Tampa Bay must pick up pace on new stadium

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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred wants Tampa Bay to work a little quicker on getting the Rays a new ballpark.

Rays Principal Owner Stuart Sternberg has been working for nearly a decade to get a new stadium for the club and signed a three-year agreement with the City of St. Petersburg early in 2016 to search for a site in the Tampa Bay area. Manfred wants that search to pick up some steam.

“I think it’s fair to say we want the process to take on a better pace moving forward,” Manfred said Wednesday night at Tropicana Field, home of the Rays since their first season in 1998.

The Rays were averaging 15,815 fans per game before Wednesday night’s contest against the Toronto Blue Jays. That is just over half the major league average of 30,470. Tropicana Field and its location have been almost universally blamed as the reason for the poor attendance.

“I’ve been pretty clear that they need a new facility here, a major league quality facility in an A-plus location,” Manfred said. “It is time to move that decision to the front burner here in Tampa.”

The matter of how a stadium would be financed has been tabled until a site is determined, but Sternberg continued to express confidence in the Tampa Bay market.

“I’ve had the opportunity to bail on it many times over the years,” he said. “I won’t say this is a slam dunk, it’s certainly not. But I think we can do something that’ll at least double our attendance. That’s a lot to ask for.”

Manfred said Major League Baseball “doesn’t have a firm timetable” for what steps to take if the Rays fail to get an agreement to build a new stadium in the Tampa Bay area, but but added that “it is a topic of discussion in the industry, the lack of progress.”

More AP baseball: https://apnews.com/tag/MLBbaseball

Robinson Cano leaves game with hamstring tightness

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Bad news for the Mariners this evening: Robinson Cano left Seattle’s game against the Atlanta Braves with tightness in his left hamstring.

Cano walked off the field after legging out a double — his second of the game — in the third inning. He pulled up as he approached second base and walked off the field, accompanied by a trainer. There was no immediate word on the severity of the injury. The Mariners have a day off Thursday before opening a series at the Yankees on Friday night, so they have some time to evaluate him.

Cano is hitting .277/.377/.460 with 19 homers and 78 RBI on the year.