Yankee Stadium: lots of dingers, but not "Coors East"

Leave a comment

Mel Antonen of USA Today has an article up about all of the homers flying out of Yankee Stadium:

Indeed, two months into the season the most expensive stadium ever
built is being tormented by unpredictable winds and beset by a chaotic
debate over whether the home runs there are the cheapest aspect of the
$1.5 billion ballpark. “There’s no doubt that the new Yankee Stadium
has taken over as the best hitters’ park in baseball,” Baltimore
Orioles first baseman Aubrey Huff says. “Someone’s going to hit 90 home
runs there.”

And, yes, by any measure the homers are up. But that’s not the whole
story. That’s because while the homers are up in dramatic fashion,
overall offense, while up as well, is not up in nearly as dramatically.
As Replacement Level Yankees’ Weblog noted last week,
Yankee Stadium’s park factor on the young season is 106, which favors
offense. Fenway Park’s park factor over the past five seasons is . . .
106.

Granted, it’s painfully early to be talking park effects — guys who
know more about these things than I do tend to want at least three
years of data before making anything approaching a definitive
conclusion — but helping to to put the numbers in perspective, Coors
Field’s lowest ever
park factor was 107, and for years sported park factors between 108 and
129, which made for a substantially more offense-friendly environment
than anything we’re seeing in New York.

I don’t suppose that makes the guys giving up the dingers any
happier, but it does put lie to the claim that Yankee Stadium is “Coors
East.”

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.