Yankee Stadium: lots of dingers, but not "Coors East"

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Mel Antonen of USA Today has an article up about all of the homers flying out of Yankee Stadium:

Indeed, two months into the season the most expensive stadium ever
built is being tormented by unpredictable winds and beset by a chaotic
debate over whether the home runs there are the cheapest aspect of the
$1.5 billion ballpark. “There’s no doubt that the new Yankee Stadium
has taken over as the best hitters’ park in baseball,” Baltimore
Orioles first baseman Aubrey Huff says. “Someone’s going to hit 90 home
runs there.”

And, yes, by any measure the homers are up. But that’s not the whole
story. That’s because while the homers are up in dramatic fashion,
overall offense, while up as well, is not up in nearly as dramatically.
As Replacement Level Yankees’ Weblog noted last week,
Yankee Stadium’s park factor on the young season is 106, which favors
offense. Fenway Park’s park factor over the past five seasons is . . .

Granted, it’s painfully early to be talking park effects — guys who
know more about these things than I do tend to want at least three
years of data before making anything approaching a definitive
conclusion — but helping to to put the numbers in perspective, Coors
Field’s lowest ever
park factor was 107, and for years sported park factors between 108 and
129, which made for a substantially more offense-friendly environment
than anything we’re seeing in New York.

I don’t suppose that makes the guys giving up the dingers any
happier, but it does put lie to the claim that Yankee Stadium is “Coors

Theo Epstein on sportswriters: “The life of a sportswriter is pretty lonely. You kind of work by yourself, sit there by yourself…”

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS - OCTOBER 07:  Chicago Cubs general manager Theo Epstein stands on the field during batting practice before the game between the Chicago Cubs and the San Francisco Giants at Wrigley Field on October 7, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)
Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

Rick Morissey of the Chicago Sun-Times published an article on Sunday giving a bit of insight into Cubs president of baseball operations Theo Epstein. When Epsten was younger, he dabbled in sportswriting, but quickly realized the trade wasn’t for him.

As Morissey details, when Epstein was 19 years old writing for Yale’s student newspaper, he wrote an article suggesting the school’s football coach should be fired during what would become a 3-7 season. Epstein was told during the meeting that one writer would defend the coach and one would call for his job. “It was a lesson in the way that the world of journalism sometimes works. It was an eye-opener for me. I regret it, and I’ve happily moved on.”

Epstein continued, “I realized I didn’t want to be a sportswriter when I was interning with the Orioles back in ’92, ’93, ’94. I did do a lot of media-relations stuff, and I saw that the life of a sportswriter is pretty lonely. You kind of work by yourself, sit there by yourself in the press box, go back to the hotel bar. Not to generalize.” He added, “But I really respect writing and respect sportswriters.”

He’s not wrong, and he seems to have found his calling as a front office executive. His Cubs are back in the World Series for the first time since 1945.

Jason Kipnis injured his ankle celebrating the pennant with Francisco Lindor

TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 17:  Jose Ramirez #11, Francisco Lindor #12, Jason Kipnis #22 and Mike Napoli #26 of the Cleveland Indians celebrate after defeating the Toronto Blue Jays with a score of 4 to 2 in game three of the American League Championship Series at Rogers Centre on October 17, 2016 in Toronto, Canada.  (Photo by Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images)
Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images

Indians second baseman Jason Kipnis tweeted on Sunday, “Got a little too close to [Francisco Lindor] during the celebration!! Freak accident but should be good to go by Tuesday! #cantkeepmeoutofthisgame!”

Per MLB.com’s Jordan Bastian, manager Terry Francona said Kipnis is dealing with a low ankle sprain, but he’s expected to be ready to go when the World Series begins on Tuesday. Kipnis went through fielding drills on Sunday.

Kipnis is hitting .167/.219/.367 with a pair of homers and four RBI in eight games this postseason.