Big Unit doesn't think he'll be the last to 300

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Despite some pretty spiffy arguments to the contrary,
so many writers seem to want to say that Randy Johnson will be the last
pitcher to win 300 that a certain conventional wisdom to that effect
has come into being. That’s fine, but even the guy whose legacy might
benefit the most from the end of the attainability of that milestone isn’t having any of it:

With his next win, he’ll be the 24th pitcher in major league history
to join the 300-victory club. And it’s fashionable to suggest he’ll be
the last of his kind. But if you make that suggestion to Johnson, don’t
expect a polite nod. Johnson’s own fossil record suggests that the next
300-game winner could be among us right now, not necessarily ticketed
for greatness but toiling to throw strikes.

“I’m not going to say I’ll be the last because everyone overlooked
me . . . That was the talk when (Tom) Glavine got there (in 2007). I
wasn’t given a chance because of my back surgeries. So I’m not one to
say who could or couldn’t. Anything’s possible. Look at me.”

Given the rarity of guys who stink until they’re 26 and then turn into perennial Cy Young candidates, we certainly shouldn’t expect
another pitcher with Randy Johnson’s career arc any time soon, but he’s
right: if one guy can start late, pitch his entire career in the
five-man rotation era and still make it to 300, another one can too.

The rest of the article attempts to profile the next 300 winner.
I’ve talked about durability and playing for a good team as being the
primary attributes, but I hadn’t considered this one:

He’ll probably spend significant time in the American League. Like
most pitchers switching to the National League, Barry Zito was happy to
leave the designated hitter behind and face lineups that had fewer
power hitters. But Zito soon discovered one of the N.L.’s pitfalls: If
you’re trailing 2-1 and you’re due to hit in the sixth inning, you’re
probably not going near the bat rack.

In the A.L., an effective starting pitcher can stick around longer
and perhaps benefit from a late rally. That might lead to a few extra
victories each season.

The A.L. can wear a guy out, but wins are every bit a function of
opportunity as they are excellence, and the D.H. league simply gives a
guy more opportunities.

No structural damage found in Andrew Benintendi’s knee

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - AUGUST 24:  Shortstop Matt Duffy #5 of the Tampa Bay Rays tags out Andrew Benintendi #40 of the Boston Red Sox after Dustin Pedroia grounded into the double play  during the seventh inning of a game on August 24, 2016 at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida. (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
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Good news in Boston: An MRI on Red Sox outfielder Andrew Benintendi‘s left knee revealed no structural damage.

Benintendi slipped while trying to avoid a tag at second base, injuring his leg, but it appears he’s avoided a serious injury. A timetable for his return isn’t known at this point, but the Red Sox expect to get him back before the end of the season.

Benintendi is hitting .324/.365/.485 with a homer and ten RBI in 21 games.

Carlos Ruiz leaves a goodbye note for the Phillies

CLEARWATER, FL - FEBRUARY 26:  Carlos Ruiz #51 of the Philadelphia Phillies poses for a portrait on February 26, 2016 at Bright House Field in Clearwater, Florida.  (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
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And then there was one. One player from the 2008 World Series champs, that is. Ryan Howard likely isn’t going anywhere so he’ll be the last one to turn the lights off, but today Carlo Ruiz bid adieu to the Phillies following his trade to Los Angeles.

Lost in all of the emotions the Dodgers are reported to be feeling about A.J. Ellis leaving is the fact that Ruiz was one of the most beloved Phillies players ever, by both his teammates and their fans. Yesterday Roy Halladay penned a heartfelt goodbye to Ruiz, suggesting that he was every bit as essential to his and the Phillies’ success as Ellis has been to Clayton Kershaw (and in pure baseball production, obviously, quite more).

Today Chooch left a message for his now former teammates: