Big Unit doesn't think he'll be the last to 300

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Despite some pretty spiffy arguments to the contrary,
so many writers seem to want to say that Randy Johnson will be the last
pitcher to win 300 that a certain conventional wisdom to that effect
has come into being. That’s fine, but even the guy whose legacy might
benefit the most from the end of the attainability of that milestone isn’t having any of it:

With his next win, he’ll be the 24th pitcher in major league history
to join the 300-victory club. And it’s fashionable to suggest he’ll be
the last of his kind. But if you make that suggestion to Johnson, don’t
expect a polite nod. Johnson’s own fossil record suggests that the next
300-game winner could be among us right now, not necessarily ticketed
for greatness but toiling to throw strikes.

“I’m not going to say I’ll be the last because everyone overlooked
me . . . That was the talk when (Tom) Glavine got there (in 2007). I
wasn’t given a chance because of my back surgeries. So I’m not one to
say who could or couldn’t. Anything’s possible. Look at me.”

Given the rarity of guys who stink until they’re 26 and then turn into perennial Cy Young candidates, we certainly shouldn’t expect
another pitcher with Randy Johnson’s career arc any time soon, but he’s
right: if one guy can start late, pitch his entire career in the
five-man rotation era and still make it to 300, another one can too.

The rest of the article attempts to profile the next 300 winner.
I’ve talked about durability and playing for a good team as being the
primary attributes, but I hadn’t considered this one:

He’ll probably spend significant time in the American League. Like
most pitchers switching to the National League, Barry Zito was happy to
leave the designated hitter behind and face lineups that had fewer
power hitters. But Zito soon discovered one of the N.L.’s pitfalls: If
you’re trailing 2-1 and you’re due to hit in the sixth inning, you’re
probably not going near the bat rack.

In the A.L., an effective starting pitcher can stick around longer
and perhaps benefit from a late rally. That might lead to a few extra
victories each season.

The A.L. can wear a guy out, but wins are every bit a function of
opportunity as they are excellence, and the D.H. league simply gives a
guy more opportunities.

Another interestingly named player is promoted by the Pirates

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When you promote a player from the minors, the first and foremost consideration is whether or not he can help your ball club. But, assuming that’s taken care of, teams should really, really make it a priority to call up dudes with cool sounding names because it makes life more interesting for the rest of us.

The Pirates are doing that. The other night Dovydas Neverauskas made his big league debut. In addition to being the first Lithuanian born-and-raised player in major league history, it’s a solid, solid name. Now the Pirates are making another promotion: Gift Ngoepe.

Yep, Gift Ngoepe. He’s an infielder from South Africa, making the leap to the bigs due to David Freese‘s hamstring injury. Ngoepe, 27, was batting just .241/.308/.379 through 66 plate appearances this season with Triple-A Indianapolis, his ninth in the minors, so he’s not exactly a prospect. But man, that’s a killer name.

It’s also worth mentioning that Gift and Neverauskas were arrested together in a bar fight last August in Toledo, so there is already a good basis for some bonding here.

Good luck, Gift. Gift Ngoepe. Mr. Ngoepe. G-Ngo. Man, I could do this all day.

Manny Machado teaches us to never give up

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The Rays beat the Orioles last night, but the play of the game belonged to an Oriole defender.

Evan Longoria was batting and he chopped a ball foul down the third base line. At least it started out foul. As we all know, however, it doesn’t matter where the ball starts, it matters where it is when it crosses the bag.

Manny Machado knows this and didn’t give up on the ball despite it starting several feet in foul territory. He watched it come back, stayed with it and threw out Longoria who, unlike Machado, did give up on it, assuming he’d merely get a strike and another hack. Watch:

Longoria would get Machado back, however, fielding a ball Machado smoked to third base in the ninth inning, recording the second to last out of the game.