Big Unit doesn't think he'll be the last to 300

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Despite some pretty spiffy arguments to the contrary,
so many writers seem to want to say that Randy Johnson will be the last
pitcher to win 300 that a certain conventional wisdom to that effect
has come into being. That’s fine, but even the guy whose legacy might
benefit the most from the end of the attainability of that milestone isn’t having any of it:

With his next win, he’ll be the 24th pitcher in major league history
to join the 300-victory club. And it’s fashionable to suggest he’ll be
the last of his kind. But if you make that suggestion to Johnson, don’t
expect a polite nod. Johnson’s own fossil record suggests that the next
300-game winner could be among us right now, not necessarily ticketed
for greatness but toiling to throw strikes.

“I’m not going to say I’ll be the last because everyone overlooked
me . . . That was the talk when (Tom) Glavine got there (in 2007). I
wasn’t given a chance because of my back surgeries. So I’m not one to
say who could or couldn’t. Anything’s possible. Look at me.”

Given the rarity of guys who stink until they’re 26 and then turn into perennial Cy Young candidates, we certainly shouldn’t expect
another pitcher with Randy Johnson’s career arc any time soon, but he’s
right: if one guy can start late, pitch his entire career in the
five-man rotation era and still make it to 300, another one can too.

The rest of the article attempts to profile the next 300 winner.
I’ve talked about durability and playing for a good team as being the
primary attributes, but I hadn’t considered this one:

He’ll probably spend significant time in the American League. Like
most pitchers switching to the National League, Barry Zito was happy to
leave the designated hitter behind and face lineups that had fewer
power hitters. But Zito soon discovered one of the N.L.’s pitfalls: If
you’re trailing 2-1 and you’re due to hit in the sixth inning, you’re
probably not going near the bat rack.

In the A.L., an effective starting pitcher can stick around longer
and perhaps benefit from a late rally. That might lead to a few extra
victories each season.

The A.L. can wear a guy out, but wins are every bit a function of
opportunity as they are excellence, and the D.H. league simply gives a
guy more opportunities.

The 2005 White Sox continue to be erased


We noted yesterday that in the rush to name the Cubs the saviors of Chicago sports fans everywhere, the 2005 Chicago White Sox — and the 1959 White Sox for that matter — are being completely overlooked as World Series champs and pennant winners, respectively.

That continued last night, as first ESPN and then the Washington Post erased the Chisox out of existence in the name of pushing their Cubs-driven narrative. I mean, get a load of this graphic:

Was there no one at the world’s largest sports network — not an anchor, production assistant, researcher, intern or even a dang janitor who could tell them what was wrong with this? Guess not!

Meanwhile, the normally reliable Barry Svrluga gives the Cubs the 2004 Red Sox treatment as a group of players who will never have to buy a drink in their city again. His story is better about keeping it franchise-centric as opposed to making it a city-wide thing, but whoever is responsible for the tweet promoting the story makes a Cubs World Series a unique thing for not just Cubs fans, but Chicago as a whole:

The White Sox play in the AL Central so I assume their fans have no love at all for the Cleveland Indians. But I can’t help but think a good number of them are rooting for the Tribe simply to push back against the complete whitewashing of the White Sox.

Kyle Schwarber is on a private plane en route to Cleveland

PHOENIX, AZ - APRIL 07:  Kyle Schwarber #12 of the Chicago Cubs bats against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the MLB game at Chase Field on April 7, 2016 in Phoenix, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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This is happening, people.

Earlier we heard Joe Maddon being non-committal about Kyle Schwarber joining the Cubs for the World Series. Now it seems pretty clear that the Cubs are committal indeed: Jon Morosi reports that Schwarber is en route to Cleveland from Arizona on a private jet and that he’s expected to DH in Game 1 tomorrow night.

Schwarber hasn’t played in a game that counted since April 7. His potent bat is could be a windfall for a Cubs team that didn’t have a game-changing option at DH in the American League park.

Schwarber lost the whole season due to a knee injury, but he hit .246/.355/.487 with 16 homers and 43 RBI in 69 games as a rookie in 2015. His big coming out party was in the playoffs, however, when he hit three homers in five postseason games while going 7-for-13 with two walks in five games.