What we're watching – June 1

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– After homering in four of the Padres’ six games on the road last
week, Adrian Gonzalez returns home to Petco to take on Joe Blanton and
the Phillies. Gonzalez is hitting a relatively modest .259 with five
homers in 85 at-bats in San Diego this year. He’s at .313 with 15
homers in 96 at-bats on the road.

– Hiroki Kuroda wasn’t any good in his rehab start last week, giving
up seven runs — five earned — and nine hits over five innings for
Single-A Inland Empire, but the Dodgers have still chosen to bring him
back to face the Diamondbacks tonight. He was 1-2 with a 4.50 ERA in
four starts against Arizona as a rookie last year. The Dodgers will
have the advantage of facing Billy Buckner, who allowed five runs in a
loss to the Padres last time out. Buckner pitched in relief against the
Dodgers on April 11 and allowed five runs in two-thirds of an inning.
He was demoted to the minors soon afterwards, only to be brought back
as a starter on May 22.

– With trade speculation ramping up, Roy Oswalt will take on the
Rockies tonight. He’s 6-1 with a 1.84 lifetime against Colorado, but
the Roy Oswalt who put up those numbers hasn’t shown up very frequently
this season. Coming off three straight no-decisions, Oswalt enters his
12th start of the season with a 1-2 record and a 4.62 ERA. Fellow
Opening Day starter Aaron Cook will pitch for Colorado.

– Derek Jeter enters Monday’s game against the Indians with a chance
of reaching two milestones: he’s two runs scored away from 1,500 and
two hits away from 2,600.

Game of the Night

Cincinnati vs. St. Louis – There are currently 38 starters with at
least five wins this season, but only one is pitching tonight. That’s
the Cardinals’ Todd Wellemeyer, who has a 5.02 ERA to go along with his
5-4 record. He has, though, allowed two runs in 11 1/3 innings over his
last two starts, both of which resulted in victories. The Reds will go
to Edinson Volquez, who is fresh off the DL after missing two starts
with back spasms. Volquez, who gave up seven runs in a start against
the Cardinals on May 10, is 4-2 with a 4.25 ERA this season.

Game 6: This is why the Astros traded for Justin Verlander

Associated Press
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Houston’s pitching has not been their biggest problem as they’ve watched their 2-0 series lead turn in to a 3-2 series deficit. It has not been good, mind you — Charlie Morton got rocked in Game 3, the bullpen collapsed on Game 4 and Dallas Keuchel was suddenly mortal in Game 5 — but even then it’s not been the biggest concern. The real problem has been the lack of offense.

The Astros led the majors in runs (896), batting average (.282), on-base percentage (.346) and slugging (.478) during the regular season and were second to the Yankees in homers. Despite that, they have scored just nine runs and have hit only one homer. The team’s ALCS batting line, those two wins included, is .147/.234/.213. As such, facing off against Luis Severino and a rested Yankees bullpen tonight can’t give them a ton of confidence.

They do have one thing going for them, however: Justin Verlander. The same Justin Verlander who received only two runs of support in Game 2 of the series but made it hold up thanks to his 124-pitch, 13-strikeout complete game victory. You can’t really expect a starter to do that sort of thing two times in a row, but that’s what the Astros acquired him for at the end of August. In a league where there are vanishingly few horses a team can ride to victory, Verlander stands as one of the few remaining old school aces. Expect A.J. Hinch to keep the bit in Verlander’s mouth for as long as this game is close and, even then, maybe an inning longer.

Is there any reason for optimism regarding the Astros’ lineup? Sure, of course. They didn’t suddenly all forget how to hit. Every team goes through a stretch of 3-5 games where the hits don’t seem to fall. There may, possibly, be some reason for hope in the man they’re facing too. Severino lasted only four innings in Game 2, having been removed early after taking a ground ball off his left wrist. Severino said he was fine and wished that Joe Girardi hadn’t taken him out, but (a) he was acting a little odd, shaking his arm out like he was trying to shake off some pain; and (b) starting pitchers almost always lie and say they’re better than they are. I’m certain Severino is healthy enough to go, but there’s at least a small chance that he’s vulnerable, somehow. At the very least Astros hitters can walk to the plate convincing themselves of it. Any edge you can either get or imagine, right?

Game 6 seems like it will have to be a matter of a small edge one way or another for both teams, really. The Yankees are rolling, but their assignment tonight is a tough one as they try to chase a guy who fancies himself — and has often shown himself — to be a rare throwback to those 1960s and 1970s aces who only seem to get better as the ballgame goes on. The Astros, meanwhile, are tasked with solving a young, fireballing stuff monster who has something to prove after his early exit in Game 2 and, even if he can’t prove it, a corps of relief aces who are among the most formidable in baseball. Add to that the notion that Major League Baseball, Fox and most commentators and casual fans outside of Houston want to see the 12th Yankees-Dodgers World Series matchup and the Astros have to be thinking everything’s against them.

Which is OK, though, right? Ballplayers love it when no one believes in them. That’s not better than six or seven runs of support, but the Astros will take anything they can get at the moment.