Craziness in the NCAA baseball tournament

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Texas and Boston College played the longest game in NCAA history Saturday night, with the Longhorns prevailing 3-2 in 25 innings.

While guys like me are worrying about the Stephen Strasburgs of the
world throwing 120 pitches in a start, Austin Wood of Texas threw a
ridiculous 169 pitches … out of the bullpen. Seriously.

Wood tossed 13 innings of relief, including 12.1 no-hit frames, and
said afterward: “I can’t believe I threw 13 innings. I was tired, but
we never doubted that we were going to win that game.” Then his arm
disintegrated as reporters looked on.

Texas coach and all-time Division I wins leader Augie Garrido called
it “the best pitching performance I have ever seen.” Boston college
coach Mik Aoki wasn’t quite as willing to shred his pitchers’ arms, so
he only let Mike Belfiore throw 9.2 innings out of the pen.

The seven-hour, three-minute game finally came to an end thanks to
Travis Tucker singling in the go-ahead run in his NCAA-record 12th
at-bat.

Along with Strasburg losing for the first time
and Texas winning in 25 innings, the opening round of the NCAA
tournament also saw Florida State jump out to a 32-0 lead over Ohio
State on the way to a 37-6 victory.

FSU had 66 total bases on 38 hits, including 15 doubles. As Ohio State
coach Bob Todd put it: “Everything they did was right. Everything we
did was wrong.” It’s not quite March Madness, but the NCAA baseball
tournament has been pretty damn interesting so far.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.