Baseball is doing its best to get replay right

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People complained that the reviews of the Gary Sheffield and Daniel
Murphy home runs this week took too long, with the former taking more
than six minutes and the latter almost four minutes. I can understand
the frustration, but you have to laud Major League Baseball for having its priorities in order:

“In the case you’re talking about, the home run call on Sheffield,
that one took about six minutes – just over six minutes. And the reason
for that was because we were really trying to get clear and convincing
evidence if we were going to overturn the call. So we were pulling up
all the various camera angles that we had available to us, and it took
us some time to discern whether or not that play could be overturned.
Ultimately, the home run was upheld, but it took a little time. But we
want to get the play right. The ultimate, ultimate, overriding concern
is to get the play right.”

Which it should be. We can argue about whether or not replay itself is
a good idea, but if you’re going to go with replay, there’s no reason
to rush it if it risks getting the call wrong.

Not that baseball shouldn’t do what it can to speed up the process
where it can. Indeed, based on some of the reviews we’ve seen, I can
think of two things that would go a long way towards making replays as
efficient as possible.

First: strongly discourage umpires from standing around trying to
decide if a replay should be reviewed. During last week’s Red Sox-Mets
game, the umps held a conclave around third base for some time,
apparently trying to determine if Youkilis’ shot down the left field
line should be reviewed. We all got pride, and umpires more than most
of us, but really, it was obvious within about five seconds of the ball
clearing the fence that there was a question as to whether it was fair
or foul. End the conference, go watch the video, get the call right,
and play ball.

Second: as we get more experience with replays, patterns are
probably going to develop. We can imagine, for example, that given the
stupid placement of the railing and advertisements on the upper deck at
Citi Field, that more than a few disputed calls are going to occur
there. Indeed, just about every park is going to have its own
particular problem areas, and once they’re identified, perhaps it would
be worth installing some fixed cameras that focus specifically on those
areas. Also, given that balls over the foul pole are going to be an
issue, maybe baseball should install the same sort of camera that sits
on every set of goal posts in the NFL.

Heck, they could even solicit sponsorships for the things. Based on the great publicity they’re getting over the Murphy homer, Subway would probably pony up at this point.

Last night was the highest rated World Series Game 1 since 2009

CLEVELAND, OH - OCTOBER 25:  Roberto Perez #55 of the Cleveland Indians hits a three-run home run during the eighth inning against the Chicago Cubs in Game One of the 2016 World Series at Progressive Field on October 25, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio.  (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)
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Major League Baseball and Fox won’t openly root for any specific team to make the World Series. But you can bet they’re pretty happy with the Cubs making it thanks to the ratings they’re delivering.

The Indians win over the Chicago in Game 1 last night drew a 12.6 overnight rating. That means, on average, 12.6 percent of the TVs in the largest 56 markets were tuned in to the game. That’s the best World Series first game rating since 2009 when the Phillies-Yankees game drew a 13.8 overnight rating. Last night’s rating was up 20% from last year’s 10.5 between the Royals-Mets and up 58% from the Giants-Royals in 2014.

Now the rooting, however quiet it may be, will continue: for the Cubs to make a series out of this so as to keep the magic numbers coming.

Twins hire Rangers assistant Thad Levine to be their new GM

BOSTON, MA - June 4: The Minnesota Twins logo is seen during the fifth inning of the game against the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park on June 4, 2015 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Winslow Townson/Getty Images)
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Rangers assistant general manager Thad Levine has been hired as the Twins’ next General Manager. It has not been made official, but multiple outlets are reporting the hire. Levine will join Derek Falvey, who was named the Twins’ new president of baseball operations last month.

Levine has been the Rangers assistant GM since the 2005 season, working as GM Jon Daniels’ second in command. He’ll still be second in command in Minnesota, but with an elevated title as is the style of the day. He previously worked with the Rockies. He has, according to various reports, been conversant in statistical analysis as well as traditional scouting and player development. As is also the style of the day.