Baseball is doing its best to get replay right

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People complained that the reviews of the Gary Sheffield and Daniel
Murphy home runs this week took too long, with the former taking more
than six minutes and the latter almost four minutes. I can understand
the frustration, but you have to laud Major League Baseball for having its priorities in order:

“In the case you’re talking about, the home run call on Sheffield,
that one took about six minutes – just over six minutes. And the reason
for that was because we were really trying to get clear and convincing
evidence if we were going to overturn the call. So we were pulling up
all the various camera angles that we had available to us, and it took
us some time to discern whether or not that play could be overturned.
Ultimately, the home run was upheld, but it took a little time. But we
want to get the play right. The ultimate, ultimate, overriding concern
is to get the play right.”

Which it should be. We can argue about whether or not replay itself is
a good idea, but if you’re going to go with replay, there’s no reason
to rush it if it risks getting the call wrong.

Not that baseball shouldn’t do what it can to speed up the process
where it can. Indeed, based on some of the reviews we’ve seen, I can
think of two things that would go a long way towards making replays as
efficient as possible.

First: strongly discourage umpires from standing around trying to
decide if a replay should be reviewed. During last week’s Red Sox-Mets
game, the umps held a conclave around third base for some time,
apparently trying to determine if Youkilis’ shot down the left field
line should be reviewed. We all got pride, and umpires more than most
of us, but really, it was obvious within about five seconds of the ball
clearing the fence that there was a question as to whether it was fair
or foul. End the conference, go watch the video, get the call right,
and play ball.

Second: as we get more experience with replays, patterns are
probably going to develop. We can imagine, for example, that given the
stupid placement of the railing and advertisements on the upper deck at
Citi Field, that more than a few disputed calls are going to occur
there. Indeed, just about every park is going to have its own
particular problem areas, and once they’re identified, perhaps it would
be worth installing some fixed cameras that focus specifically on those
areas. Also, given that balls over the foul pole are going to be an
issue, maybe baseball should install the same sort of camera that sits
on every set of goal posts in the NFL.

Heck, they could even solicit sponsorships for the things. Based on the great publicity they’re getting over the Murphy homer, Subway would probably pony up at this point.

David Wright isn’t ready to retire

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There’s no doubt that the last three years have put David Wright through the ringer. The Mets third baseman missed the bulk of his 2015 season with spinal stenosis and made it through a month of games in 2016 before undergoing season-ending surgery to repair a herniated disc in his neck. In 2017, a bout of shoulder impingement, rotator cuff surgery and a laminotomy procedure on his lower back kept him off the field for all 162 games.

Despite the continual setbacks, Wright told MLB.com’s Anthony DiComo, he doesn’t believe retirement is in the cards for him this year. “When the end comes, the end comes,” he said Friday. “Hopefully, I’ve got a little more left. But I guess that’s to be determined.”

The 35-year-old last appeared for High-A St. Lucie in 2017, powering through three games with one hit and five strikeouts in 10 plate appearances. His career has advanced in fits and starts since 2015, but you don’t have to do too much digging to find his last great performance with the Mets. Wright earned his seventh career All-Star berth in 2013, slashing .307/.390/.514 with 18 home runs and a terrific 6.0 fWAR in 492 PA. While he isn’t expected to mash at those levels in the near future, if ever again, the Mets believe the veteran third baseman might still have something left in the tank as he tries to extend a 13-year run in the majors.

Per DiComo, the only thing standing in his way is a clean bill of health — not just for the upcoming season, but for the years to come. Wright said he wouldn’t risk returning to the field if it came with long-term implications for his quality of life.

The surgeries are obviously serious stuff, but it just kind of plays with your mind mentally, where you don’t know how your body’s going to hold up,” Wright said. “You don’t know how you’re going to feel a month from now. You don’t know how you’re going to feel a couple weeks from now. You’re hoping that it continues to get better, but you just don’t know.

Given the uncertainty that surrounds his return to the game, it’s a prudent outlook to have.